Commands by jslopez (1)

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Fill up disk space (for testing)
Put into some file. No special purpouse, just for fun...

Shows the torrent file name along with the trackers url
Replace * with any filename matching glob or an individual filename

Speaking alarm clock
This ran on a ubuntu box using espeak for speaking text with the bash shell. On a mac you should use 'say'. Also you can change your alarm interval and your snooze interval which are currently 8 hours and 1 minute. I would run this via cron yet it's easier to disable if you run it as a command like this :P

save stderr only to a file
taken from http://www.unix.com/shell-programming-scripting/158311-how-tee-stderr.html " What does it mean? The redirection operator n>&m makes file descriptor n to be a copy of file descriptor m. So, whe are: - Opening a new file descriptor, 3, that is a copy of file descriptor 1, the standard output; - Making file descriptor 1 a copy of file descriptor 2, the standard error output; - Making file descriptor 2 to be a copy of file descriptor 3 (the "backup" of the standard output) in a short: we swapped the standard output and the standard error output. "

back ssh from firewalled hosts
host B (you) redirects a modem port (62220) to his local ssh. host A is a remote machine (the ones that issues the ssh cmd). once connected port 5497 is in listening mode on host B. host B just do a ssh 127.0.0.1 -p 5497 -l user and reaches the remote host'ssh. This can be used also for vnc and so on.

List the size (in human readable form) of all sub folders from the current location

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Check whether laptop is running on battery or cable
In my case it was actually like this...

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Create cheap and easy index.html file
If your admin has disabled Apache's directory index feature but you want to have a cheap way to enable it for one folder, this command will just create an index.html file with a link to each file in the directory (including the index.html file, which is not ideal but makes the command much simpler). The HTML isn't even remotely compliant, but it could easily be improved on. Also, the command needs to be run each time a file is added or removed to update the index.html file.


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