Commands by justsomeguy (1)

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Copy ssh keys to [email protected] to enable password-less ssh logins.
To generate the keys use the command ssh-keygen

Use /dev/full to test language I/O-failsafety
The Linux /dev/full file simulates a "disk full" condition, and can be used to verify how a program handles this situation. In particular, several programming language implementations do not print error diagnostics (nor exit with error status) when I/O errors like this occur, unless the programmer has taken additional steps. That is, simple code in these languages does not fail safely. In addition to Perl, C, C++, Tcl, and Lua (for some functions) also appear not to fail safely.

if you are working in two different directories; e.g. verifying files in your home directory; ls ~/ and you need to cd to the /etc/directory. you can enter 'cd -' (no single quotes) to go back and forth between directories.

Show bandwidth use oneliner
poorman's ifstat using just sh and awk. You must change "eth0" with your interface's name.

C function manual

archlinux:Delete packages from pacman cache that are older than 7 days
for debian/ubuntu

Remove grep itself from ps
When you 'ps|grep' for a given process, it turns out that grep itself appears as a valid line since it contains the RE/name you are looking for. To avoid grep from showing itself, simply insert some wildcard into process' name.

Find files containing string and open in vim
I often use "vim -p" to open in tabs rather than buffers.

GREP a PDF file.
This is a good alternative to pdf2text for Ubuntu. To install it: sudo apt-get install python-pdfminer

use the real 'rm', distribution brain-damage notwithstanding
The backslash avoids any 'rm' alias that might be present and runs the 'rm' command in $PATH instead. In a misguided attempt to be more "friendly", some Linux distributions (or sites/etc.) alias 'rm' to 'rm -i'. Unfortunately, this trains users to expect that files won't actually be deleted until they okay it. This expectation will fail with catastrophic results when they use other distributions, move to other sites, etc., and doesn't really even work 100% even with the alias. It's too late to fix 'rm', but '\rm' should work everywhere (under bash).


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