Commands by kakaroto_win2k (1)

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recursive search and replace old with new string, inside files
Search and replace recursively. :-) Shorter and simpler than the others. And allows more terms: replace old new [old new ...] -- `find -type f`

Recursive Ownership Change
Changing files ownership in a directory recursivley from a user to another

colored prompt
It colors the machine name and current directory different colors for easy viewing.

Bash autocomplete case insensitive search
Change bash autocomplete case search to insensitive when pressing tab for completion.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Copy files to a remote host with SFTP with a leading dot, then rename them to the real file name
Usage: $ sftp-cp * | sftp user@host:/dir This is useful if there is a process on the remote machine waiting for files in an incoming directory. This way it won't see half-transmitted files if it ignores hidden files.

Exclude grep from your grepped output of ps (alias included in description)
Surround the first letter of what you are grepping with square brackets and you won't have to spawn a second instance of grep -v. You could also use an alias like this (albeit with sed): alias psgrep='ps aux | grep $(echo $1 | sed "s/^\(.\)/[\1]/g")'

Convert JSON to YAML

find files ignoring .svn and its decendents

Verify/edit bash history command before executing it
Bash history commands are those that begin with the character ! (eg. the most popular 'sudo !!' Explained here => http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/13). By default bash immediately executes the history command. Setting this shell option will make bash first allow you to verify/edit an history command before executing it. To set this option permanently, put this command in ~/.profile or ~/.bashrc file. To unset this option issue following command. $shopt -u histverify


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