Commands by kanaka (1)

  • This command finds the 5 (-n5) most frequently updated logs in /var/log, and then does a multifile tail follow of those log files. Alternately, you can do this to follow a specific list of log files: sudo tail -n0 -f /var/log/{messages,secure,cron,cups/error_log} Show Sample Output


    5
    ls -drt /var/log/* | tail -n5 | xargs sudo tail -n0 -f
    kanaka · 2009-07-22 14:44:41 0

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