Commands by karlsson (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Show whats going on restoring files from a spectrum protect backup
spectrum protect's dsmc command shows file names and total amount of restore. This command shows which files are actually open and their siz in GB and highlights the change to the previous output

find large files
simple find -> xargs sort of thing that I get a lot of use out of. Helps find huge files and gives an example of how to use xargs to deal with them. Tested on OSX snow leopard (10.6). Enjoy.

Poor man's ntpdate

Print Asterisk phone logs
Prints a log of phonecalls placed from/to an asterisk server, formated into an easily readable table. You can use partial number/queue matches, or use .* to match everything.

Remove everything except that file
it will remove everything except the file names matching you can use also use wildcards

Delete all empty lines from a file with vim
If you need to delete lines that may contain space characters (such as tabs or spaces) as well as empty ones, try: $:v/\S/d Just an alternative.

Rename files in batch

lazy SQL QUERYING
This is regarding the command 8263 using an alias to fill in command line options for psql. You can actually just type 'psql'. In order for that to work, you want to set environment variables PGDATABASE, PGHOST, PGUSER, and (except you're using the default) PGPORT. Also, you can add a line "host:port:dbname:user:password" (asterisk ok in some columns) to your ~/.pgpass file. Finally, if you don't like the aligned columns, you can add the line "\pset format unaligned" to your ~/.psqlrc file.

Bash function that saves bash functions to file from shell session
The simpler, 1-arg version is save_function(){ { date +"# %F.%T $1; declare -f "$1";}| tee -a ~/.bash_functions; }`

Show errors in the kernel ring buffer
Much more useful then parsing syslog


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