Commands by kennethjor (5)

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a function to create a box of '=' characters around a given string.
First argument: string to put a box around. Second argument: character to use for box (default is '=') Same as command #4962, cleaned up, shortened, and more efficient. Now a ' * ' can be used as the box character, and the variables get unset so they don't mess with anything else you might have. They marked c++ as a function for this command, but I'm not sure why. Must be a bug.

reverse-i-search: Search through your command line history
"What it actually shows is going to be dependent on the commands you've previously entered. When you do this, bash looks for the last command that you entered that contains the substring "ls", in my case that was "lsof ...". If the command that bash finds is what you're looking for, just hit Enter to execute it. You can also edit the command to suit your current needs before executing it (use the left and right arrow keys to move through it). If you're looking for a different command, hit Ctrl+R again to find a matching command further back in the command history. You can also continue to type a longer substring to refine the search, since searching is incremental. Note that the substring you enter is searched for throughout the command, not just at the beginning of the command." - http://www.linuxjournal.com/content/using-bash-history-more-efficiently

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Run a program transparently, but print a stack trace if it fails
For automated unit tests I wanted my program to run normally, but if it crashed, to add a stack trace to the output log. I came up with this command so I wouldn't have to mess around with core files. The one downside is that it does smoosh your program's stderr and stdout together.

Using PIPEs, Execute a command, convert output to .png file, upload file to imgur.com, then returning the address of the .png.
imgur < /etc/issue % Total % Received % Xferd Average Speed Time Time Time Current Dload Upload Total Spent Left Speed 100 2360 0 635 100 1725 1027 2792 --:--:-- --:--:-- --:--:-- 4058 http://i.imgur.com/bvbUD.png

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Use all the cores or CPUs when compiling
Force make command to create as many compile processes as specified (4 in the example), so that each one goes into one core or CPU and compilation happens in parallel. This reduces the time required to compile a program by up to a half in the case of CPUs with 2 cores, one fourth in the case of quad cores... and so on.

Processes by CPU usage

find an unused unprivileged TCP port
Some commands (such as netcat) have a port option but how can you know which ports are unused?

Size (in bytes) of all RPM packages installed
This command will output the size of all RPM packages and string them together into one enormous addition command which will be calculated by the echo $(( ))


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