Commands by king_77 (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Enable color pattern match highlighting in grep(1)
This will affect all invocations of grep, even when it is called from inside a script.

Create a file server, listening in port 7000
At client side: tar c myfile | nc localhost 7000 ##Send file myfile to server tar c mydir | nc localhost 7000 ## Send directory mydir to server

The program listening on port 8080 through IPv6

Kills a process that is locking a file.
Useful when you're trying to unmount a volume and other sticky situations where a rogue process is annoying the hell out of you.

Sort a character string
Sorts a character string, using common shell commands.

Run 10 curl commands in parallel via xargs (v2, faster then v1)

Adding Prefix to File name

ssh tunnel with auto reconnect ability

Put uppercase letters in curly brackets in a BibTeX database
It is often recommended to enclose capital letters in a BibTeX file in braces, so the letters will not be transformed to lower case, when imported from LaTeX. This is an attempt to apply this rule to a BibTeX database file. DO NOT USE sed '...' input.bib > input.bib as it will empty the file! How it works: $ /^\s*[^@%]/ Apply the search-and-replace rule to lines that start (^) with zero or more white spaces (\s*), followed by any character ([...]) that is *NOT* a "@" or a "%" (^@%). $ s===g Search (s) for some stuff and replace by other stuff. Do that globally (g) for all matches in each processed line. $ \([A-Z][A-Z]*\)\([^}A-Z]\|},$\) Matches at least one uppercase letter ([A-Z][A-Z]*) followed by a character that is EITHER not "}" and not a capital letter ([^}A-Z]) OR (|) it actually IS a "}", which is followed by "," at the end of the line ($). Putting regular expressions in escaped parentheses (\( and \), respectively) allows to dereference the matched string later. $ {\1}\2 Replace the matched string by "{", followed by part 1 of the matched string (\1), followed by "}", followed by the second part of the matched string (\2). I tried this with GNU sed, only, version 4.2.1.

Search commandlinefu.com from the command line using the API
Search for one/many words on commandlinefu, results in vim for easy copy, manipulation. The -R flag is for readonly mode...you can still write to a file, but vim won't prompt for save on quit. What I'd really like is a way to do this from within vim in a new tab. Something like $ :Tex path/to/file but $ :cmdfu search terms


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