Commands by kiwi (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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Recursively remove all subversion folders

Run a command as root, with a delay
$ sleep 1h ; sudo command or $ sudo sleep 1h ; sudo command won't work, because by the time the delay is up, sudo will want your password again.

umount --rbind mount with submounts
Original: https://bugzilla.redhat.com/show_bug.cgi?id=194342

Watch how many tcp connections there are per state every two seconds.

all out
How to force a userid to log out of a Linux host, by killing all processes owned by the user, including login shells:

List all open ports and their owning executables
Particularly useful on OS X where netstat doesn't have -p option.

Anti DDOS
Takes IP from web logs and pipes to iptables, use grep to white list IPs.. use if a particular file is getting requested by many different addresses. Sure, its already down pipe and you bandwidth may suffer but that isnt the concern. This one liner saved me from all the traffic hitting the server a second time, reconfigure your system so your system will work like blog-post-1.php or the similar so legitimate users can continue working while the botnet kills itself.

Find the package a command belongs to on debian-based distros
Advanced revision to the command 8776 . This revision follows symbolic links. The quotation-marks surrounding $(which $1) allows for graceful handling of errors ( ie. readlink does not complain incase 'which' command generates (null) output)

Determine if a command is in your $PATH using POSIX
it is generally advised to avoid using which(1) whenever possible. which(1) is usually a csh(1) script, or sometimes a compiled binary. It's output is highly variable from operating system to operating system, so platform independent scripts could become quite complicated with the logic. On HP-UX 10.20, for example, it prints "no bash in /path /path /path ..."; on OpenBSD 4.1, it prints "bash: Command not found."; on Debian (3.1 through 5.0 at least) and SuSE, it prints nothing at all; on Red Hat 5.2, it prints "which: no bash in (/path:/path:...)"; on Red Hat 6.2, it writes the same message, but on standard error instead of standard output; and on Gentoo, it writes something on stderr. And given all these differences, it's still variable based on your shell. This is why POSIX is king. See http://mywiki.wooledge.org/BashFAQ/081 for more ways on avoiding which(1).

gvim in full screen (execute again to toggle full screen on/off)
Only under linux. Requires Gvim compiled with "clientserver" functionality and wmctrl command installed on system. Instead of servername can be used the current edited file name. Put it in a function and map it for get rid of "Press a key" after execution.


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