Commands by klepsydra (1)

  • couldn't stand previous unsortability of at jobs list Show Sample Output


    0
    atq |sort -k 6n -k 3M -k 4n -k 5 -k 7 -k 1
    klepsydra · 2012-05-03 23:15:08 0

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