Commands by knoopx (1)

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Determine MAC address of remote host when you know its IP address
arping sends ARP requests to a neighboring host. This won't work if there is an ARP subnet gateway in the middle. If there is, you'll just get the gateway's MAC address not the host's address you are really trying to get to.

Rename files in batch

Clear terminal Screen

Schedule a command while one is already running.
Useful when you have only one terminal session e.g. ssh. and want to queue up another command after the currently running has finished(in case if you forget to run that command). Originally used as ; python-updater when running emerge. When I have noticed that a package failed due to that command not run.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Yet Another Large Screen Clock

Log the current memory statistics frequently to syslog
Uses logger in a while loop to log memory statistics frequently into the local syslog server.

Export a subset of a database
Limits the number of rows per table to X

Hostname tab-completion for ssh
This is meant for the bash shell. Put this function in your .profile and you'll be able to use tab-completion for sshing any host which is in your known_hosts file. This assumes that your known_hosts file is located at ~/.ssh/known_hosts. The "complete" command should go on a separate line as such: function autoCompleteHostname() { local hosts=($(awk '{print $1}' ~/.ssh/known_hosts | cut -d, -f1)); local cur=${COMP_WORDS[COMP_CWORD]}; COMPREPLY=($(compgen -W '${hosts[@]}' -- $cur )) } complete -F autoCompleteHostname ssh

Undo commit in Mercurial


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