Commands by komalzahid (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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pngcrush all .png files in the directory
Find all pngs in directory structure and pngcrush them, none destructive. You can just remove the "{}.crush" part if you want destructive.

To play a file at 1.5 times normal speed without increasing the pitch

Load your [git-controlled] working files into the vi arglist.
Branch name may be substituted, of course.

deaggregate ip ranges
Taking file with ip ranges, each on it's own line like: $cat ipranges.txt 213.87.86.160-213.87.86.193 213.87.87.0-213.87.88.255 91.135.210.0-91.135.210.255 command returns deaggregated ip ranges using ipcalc deaggregate feature like that: 213.87.86.160/27 213.87.86.192/31 213.87.87.0/24 213.87.88.0/24 91.135.210.0/24 Useful for configuring nginx geo module

Change Windows Domain password from Linux
If you use Linux in a Windows domain and there are N days to expiry, this is how you can change it without resorting to a windows machine.

rsync + find
rsync from source to dest all between >30

Find unused IPs on a given subnet
Somewhat shorter version.

Alias to securely run X from tty and close that tty afterwards.
There are different ways to run X, I prefer to run it without xdm/gdm. The problem is you can't lock X because one can press Ctrl+Alt+F1, press Ctrl+Z and kill you X locking process. Of course you can disable Ctrl+Alt* or Ctrl+Alt+Backspace keys, but it's inconvinient if you really need to switch into console.

Look up the definition of a word
A bash function might also be useful: $ dict() { curl dict://dict.org/d:$1; } Or if you want less verbose output: $ dict() { curl -s dict://dict.org/d:$1 | perl -ne 's/\r//; last if /^\.$/; print if /^151/../^250/'; }

Listing directory content of a directory with a lot of entries
Ever wanted to get the directory content with 'ls' or 'find' and had to wait minutes until something was printed? Perl to the rescue. The one-liner above(redirected to a file) took less than five seconds to run in a directory with more man 2 million files. One can adapt it to e.g. delete files that match a certain pattern.


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