Commands by kplimack (1)

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List all information about all files (in current dir)
This is a funny usage of the traditional command ls. It could be basically simplified as: $ ls -a -l Duplicating arguments is permitted: $ ls -a -l -l And this markup could be shortened as: $ ls -al Extra note: To view filesizes like a pro, pray for your God: $ ls -allah

Creates a symbolic link or overwrites an existing one
-n: dereference the existing link -v: (optional) to be sure of what is being done -f: force the deletion of the existing one -s: creates a symlink Be careful: the destination can also be a file or a directory and it will be overwritten.

One liner to kill a process when knowing only the port where the process is running
-k (kill option ) . To kill all processes accessing this port

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Append last argument to last command
Just like "!$", except it does it instantly. Then you can hit enter if you want.

Ping xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx ip 100000 times with size 1024bytes

Rename files in batch

Scroll up (or Down (PgDn)) in any terminal session (except KDE)

View network activity of any application or user in realtime
The "-r 2" option puts lsof in repeat mode, with updates every 2 seconds. (Ctrl -c quits) The "-p" option is used to specify the application PID you want to monitor. The "-u' option can be used to keep an eye on a users network activity. "lsof -r 2 -u username -i -a"

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.


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