Commands by labynocle (1)

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Save a file you edited in vim without the needed permissions
I often forget to sudo before editing a file I don't have write permissions on. When you come to save that file and get the infamous "E212: Can't open file for writing", just issue that vim command in order to save the file without the need to save it to a temp file and then copy it back again.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

List the URLs of tabs of the frontmost Chrome window in OS X
This also works with Safari if you just change the application name. Replace $ window 1 with $ windows to list the URLs of tabs in all windows instead of only the frontmost window. This also includes titles: $ osascript -e{'set o to""','tell app"google chrome"','repeat with t in tabs of window 1','set o to o&url of t&"\n"&" "&title of t&"\n"',end,end}|sed \$d .

Find default gateway (proper at ppp connections too)

Google text-to-speech in mp3 format

List dot-files and dirs, but not . or ..

Show IP Address in prompt --> PS1 var
when working with many machines in a computer lab need to know the IP addr is very large, this is a simplistic solution to make things easier

List all symbolic links in current directory
For those who don't have the symlinks command, you can use readlink. This command is not straightforward because readlink is very picky. The backslash in front of 'ls' means not to use an alias (e.g. color escape codes from an aliased 'ls' could mess up readlink), and the -1 (one) means to print the entries separated by newlines. xargs -l (the letter L) means to process each input separated by newlines as separate commands.

Define words and phrases with google.
This function takes a word or a phrase as arguments and then fetches definitions using Google's "define" syntax. The "nl" and perl portion isn't strictly necessary. It just makes the output a bit more readable, but this also works: $define(){ local y="[email protected]";curl -sA"Opera" "http://www.google.com/search?q=define:${y// /+}"|grep -Po '(?/dev/null;}

Preserve user variables when running commands with sudo.
In this case the current user has proxy variable set which allows access to the rpm on the internet but needs root privs to install it. Running sudo -E preserves the current user proxy var and allows the rpm install to be executed with sudo.


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