Commands by lajarre (1)

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Check if your desired password is already available in haveibeenpwnd database. This command uses the API provided by HIBP

Find the processes that are on the runqueue. Processes with a status of
Want to know why your load average is so high? Run this command to see what processes are on the run queue. Runnable processes have a status of "R", and commands waiting on I/O have a status of "D". On some older versions of Linux may require -emo instead of -eo. On Solaris: ps -aefL -o s -o user -o comm | egrep "^O|^R|COMMAND"

BASH: Print shell variable into AWK

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Backup a file with a date-time stamp
$ buf myfile.txt This is useful when you are making small but frequent changes to a file. It keeps things organised and clear for another administrator to see what changed and at what time. An overview of changes can be deduced using a simple: $ ls -ltr

Convert tab separate file (TSV) to JSON with jq
With this command you can convert a tab separate file (TSV) into a JSON file with jq. For example, this input.tsv i-0b9adca882e5e6326 172.16.0.188 i-088dd69e5c3624888 172.16.0.102 i-0e70eac180537d4aa 172.16.0.85 will produce the showed output.

Annotate tail -f with timestamps

Show git branches by date - useful for showing active branches

Show top 50 running processes ordered by highest memory/cpu usage refreshing every 1s
http://alvinalexander.com/linux/unix-linux-process-memory-sort-ps-command-cpu for an overview of --sort available values

Extract icons from windows exe/dll
wrestool can be found in icoutils (http://www.nongnu.org/icoutils)


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