Commands by lhb (4)

  • When expanding, bash output the command, so don't be affraid if you type the command. Here is the details: First examples: echo foo bar foobar barfoo First argument: echo !$ echo barfoo barfoo (Note that typing echo foo bar foobar barfoo && echo !$, bash substitute !$ with $:1) Last argument: echo foo bar foobar barfoo && echo !^ echo foo bar foobar barfoo && echo barfoo foo bar foobar barfoo barfoo All the arguments: echo !* echo foo bar foobar barfoo foo bar foobar barfoo The third argument: echo foo bar foobar barfoo && echo !:3 echo foo bar foobar barfoo && echo foobar foo bar foobar barfoo foobar You may want to add {} for large numbers: echo !:{11} for example Now with path: echo /usr/bin/foobar /usr/bin/foobar For the head: echo !$:h echo /usr/bin /usr/bin And the tail: echo !$:t echo foobar foobar You also may want to try !:h and !:t or !!3-4 for the third and the fourth (so !!:* == !!:1-$)


    11
    echo foo bar foobar barfoo && echo !$ !^ !:3 !* && echo /usr/bin/foobar&& echo !$:h !$:t
    lhb · 2009-02-17 09:10:17 4
  • tar options may change ;) c to compress into a tar file, z for gzip (j for bzip) man tar -print0 and -0t are usefull for names with spaces, \, etc.


    5
    find ~/bin/ -name "*sh" -print0 | xargs -0t tar -zcvf foofile.tar.gz
    lhb · 2009-02-17 08:48:34 6
  • seq allows you to format the output thanks to the -f option. This is very useful if you want to rename your files to the same format in order to be able to easily sort for example: for i in `seq 1 3 10`; do touch foo$i ;done And ls foo* | sort -n foo1 foo10 foo4 foo7 But: for i in `seq -f %02g 1 3 10`; do touch foo$i ;done So ls foo* | sort -n foo01 foo04 foo07 foo10 Show Sample Output


    4
    for i in `seq -f %03g 5 50 111`; do echo $i ; done
    lhb · 2009-02-17 08:41:44 4

  • 4
    alias lrt='ls -lart'
    lhb · 2009-02-16 11:19:29 96

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