Commands by lig0n (2)

  • Scrap everything and use `gawk` to do all the magic, since it's like the future or something. gawk 'match($11, /[a-z]{3}$/) && match($9, /^ata-/) { gsub("../", ""); print $11,"\t",$9 }' Yank out only ata- lines that have a drive letter (ignore lines with partitions). Then strip ../../ and print the output. Yay awk. Be sure to see the alternatives as my initial command is listed there. This one is a revision of the original. Show Sample Output


    2
    ls -l /dev/disk/by-id |gawk 'match($11, /[a-z]{3}$/) && match($9, /^ata-/) { gsub("../", ""); print $11,"\t",$9 }' |sort
    lig0n · 2015-05-18 15:42:33 1
  • This is much easier to parse and do something else with (eg: automagically create ZFS vols) than anything else I've found. It also helps me keep track of which disks are which, for example, when I want to replace a disk, or image headers in different scenarios. Being able to match a disk to the kernels mapping of said drive the disks serial number is very helpful ls -l /dev/disk/by-id Normal `ls` command to list contents of /dev/disk/by-id grep -v "wwn-" Perform an inverse search - that is, only output non-matches to the pattern 'wwn-' egrep "[a-zA-Z]{3}$" A regex grep, looking for three letters and the end of a line (to filter out fluff) sed 's/\.\.\/\.\.\///' Utilize sed (stream editor) to remove all occurrences of "../../" sed -E 's/.*[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}\s//' Strip out all user and permission fluff. The -E option lets us use extended (modern) regex notation (larger control set) sed -E 's/->\ //' Strip out ascii arrows "-> " sort -k2 Sort the resulting information alphabetically, on column 2 (the disk letters) awk '{print $2,$1}' Swap the order of the columns so it's easier to read/utilize output from sed 's/\s/\t/' Replace the space between the two columns with a tab character, making the output more friendly For large ZFS pools, this made creating my vdevs immeasurably easy. By keeping track of which disks were in which slot (spreadsheet) via their serial numbers, I was able to then create my vols simply by copying and pasting the full output of the disk (not the letter) and pasting it into my command. Thereby allowing me to know exactly which disk, in which slot, was going into the vdev. Example command below. zpool create tank raidz2 -o ashift=12 ata-... ata-... ata-... ata-... ata-... ata-... Show Sample Output


    0
    ls -l /dev/disk/by-id |grep -v "wwn-" |egrep "[a-zA-Z]{3}$" |sed 's/\.\.\/\.\.\///' |sed -E 's/.*[0-9]{2}:[0-9]{2}\s//' |sed -E 's/->\ //' |sort -k2 |awk '{print $2,$1}' |sed 's/\s/\t/'
    lig0n · 2015-01-25 19:29:40 0

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

distribution specific information

Create date-based tgz of current dir, runs in the background, very very cool
This is freaking sweet!!! Here is the full alias, (I didn't want to cause display problems on commandlinefu.com's homepage): $ alias tarred='( ( D=`builtin pwd`; F=$(date +$HOME/`sed "s,[/ ],#,g"

Convert all WMF images to SVG recursively ignoring file extension case
This assumes you have the package installed necessary for converting WMF files. On my Ubuntu box, this is libwmf-bin. I used this command, as libwmf is not on my wife's iMac, so I archived the directories containing the WMF files from OS X, ran them on my Ubuntu box, archived the resulting SVGs, and sent them back to her. Quick, simple and to the point. Searches directories recursively looking for extensions ignoring case. This is much more readable and clean than -exec for find. The while loop also gives further flexibility on complex logic. Also, although there is 'wmf2svg --auto', it expects lowercase extensions, and not uppercase. Because I want to ignore case, I need to use the -o option instead. Works in ZSH and BASH. Haven't tested in other shells.

Replace "space" char with "dot" char in current directory file names

Make a directory named with the current date
Create a directory named with the current date in ISO 8601 format (yyyy-mm-dd). Useful for storing backups by date. The --iso switch may only work with GNU date, can use format string argument for other date versions.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Stage only portions of the changes to a file.

Introduction to user commands
Tested on debian and ubuntu. Translations could be useless, so "LANG=C man intro" is a better alternative.

Redirect bash built-in output to stdout
I've had a horrible time trying to pipe the output of some shell built-ins like 'time' to other programs. The built-in doesn't output to stdout or stderr most of the time but using the above will let you pipe the output to something else.

Show current working directory of a process


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: