Commands by lionping (4)

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Unix time to local time
Today

generate 30 x 30 matrix
Replaces hexdump with the more succint xxd, and the sed was unnecessarily complex.

Insert a line at the top of a text file without sed or awk or bash loops
Just use '-' to use STDIN as an additional input to 'cat'

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Creates a 'path' command that always prints the full path to any file
The command creates an alias called 'path', so it's useful to add it to your .profile or .bash_profile. The path command then prints the full path of any file, directory, or list of files given. Soft links will be resolved to their true location. This is especially useful if you use scp often to copy files across systems. Now rather then using pwd to get a directory, and then doing a separate cut and paste to get a file's name, you can just type 'path file' and get the full path in one operation.

Getting ESP and EIP addresses from running processes
'ps' let you specify the format that you want to see on the output.

Create a local compressed tarball from remote host directory
This improves on #9892 by compressing the directory on the remote machine so that the amount of data transferred over the network is much smaller. The command uses ssh(1) to get to a remote host, uses tar(1) to archive and compress a remote directory, prints the result to STDOUT, which is written to a local file. In other words, we are archiving and compressing a remote directory to our local box.

network throughput test
On the machine acting like a server, run: $ iperf -s On the machine acting like a client, run: $ iperf -c ip.add.re.ss where ip.add.re.ss is the ip or hostname of the server.

Print a row of characters across the terminal
shorter than alternative

dd with progress bar
piping through 'pv' shows a simple progress/speed bar for dd. This is a replacement for my otherwise favorite 'while :;do killall -USR1 dd;sleep 1;done'


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