Commands by lowry (1)

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List available upgrades from apt without upgrading the system

Found how how much memory in kB $PID is occupying in Linux
The "proportional set size" is probably the closest representation of how much active memory a process is using in the Linux virtual memory stack. This number should also closely represent the %mem found in ps(1), htop(1), and other utilities.

grep for minus (-) sign
Use flag "--" to stop switch parsing

Block all IPv4 addresses that has brute forcing our ssh server
For ipv6 use: grep -oE "\b([0-9A-Fa-f]{1,4}:){7}[0-9A-Fa-f]{1,4}\b"

Find where a kind of file is stored
In this case searches for where .desktop files are stored. The resulted is a sorted list of the top directories containing such files.

Backup of a partition
Clone a partion with tar.

Display the standard deviation of a column of numbers with awk

Check RAM size
Check RAM size

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Print every Nth line (to a maximum)
Thanks to knoppix5 for the idea :-) Print selected lines from a file or the output of a command. Usage: $ every NTH MAX [FILE] Print every NTH line (from the first MAX lines) of FILE. If FILE is omitted, stdin is used. The command simply passes the input to a sed script: $ sed -n -e "${2}q" -e "0~${1}p" ${3:-/dev/stdin} print no output $ sed -n quit after this many lines (controlled by the second parameter) $ -e "${2}q" print every NTH line (controlled by the first parameter) $ -e "0~${1}p" take input from $3 (if it exists) otherwise use /dev/stdin ${3:-/dev/stdin}


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