Commands by lox (1)

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Check if a machine is online with better UI
I have used single packet, and in a silent mode with no display of ping stats. This is with color and UI improvement to the http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/10220/check-if-a-machine-is-online. It is as per the enhancements suggested.

Using column to format a directory listing
Using column to format a directory listing

Twitpic upload and Tweet

Get the size of all the directories in current directory

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Count lines of code across multiple file types, sorted by least amount of code to greatest
Gives you a nice quick summary of how many lines each of your files is comprised of. (In this example, we just check .c, .h, .php and .pl). Since we just use wc -l to count, you'll just get a very rough estimate of how many lines of actual code there are. Use a more sophisticated algorithm instead if you need to.

Cut the first 'N' characters of a line
Saves one character, the original is probably clearer

convert wav into mp3 using lame

find which of the zip files contains the file you're searching for
This command find which of your zip (or jar) files (when you have lots of them) contains a file you're searching for. It's useful when you have a lot of zip (or jar) files and need to know in which of them the file is archived. It's most common with .jar files when you have to know which of the .jar files contains the java class you need. To find in jar files, you must change "zip" to "jar" in the "find" command. The [internal file name] must be changed to the file name you're searching that is archived into one of the zip/jar files. Before run this command you must step into the directory that contains the zip or jar files.


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