Commands by ludogomez (1)

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sudo for launching gui apps in background
Need package: gksu Note: Launching gui app in background that needs sudo, won't work great with our old friendly style of launching: $ sudo gedit /etc/passwd & because this would put sudo in background ! Using gksudo as demonstrated, would popup a gui sudo window. May be this is a common knowledge, but not knowing this frustrated me during my newbie year.

Export MS Access mdb files to csv
-H suppress Headers -I Inserts instead of csv -R to give ; as the row delimeter. Probably you can concatenate each line with a ; while importing to the db.

quick and dirty formatting for HTML code
Finds all the closing tags in a HTML document via non-greedy regex and adds a linefeed for easier reading/editing . sed -i.bak -r 's_(/[^>]*?>)_\1\n_g' filename.html . This will save a copy of filename.html as filename.html.bak and then add the linefeeds to the original file

Rename files in batch

Recursive find and replace file extension / suffix (mass rename files)
Find recursively all files in ~/Notes with the extension '.md' and pipe that via xargs to rename command, which will replace every '.md' to '.txt' in this example (existing files will not be overwritten).

Use tee + process substitution to split STDOUT to multiple commands
Using process substitution, we can 'trick' tee into sending a command's STDOUT to an arbitrary number of commands. The last command (command4) in this example will get its input from the pipe.

Use mtr to create a text file report
The report mode of mtr produces a text formated result of the mtr run using the number of ping cycles stated by the command. This text file could then be attached to an email with ease. I use this also without the ">" portion when writing email from within mutt using VI from the command mode with ":r !mtr --report --report-cycles 10 www.google.com" to actually input the same output in the body of an email.

Sum columns from CSV column $COL

Adjust gamma so monitor doesn't mess up your body's clock
[UPDATE: Now works for multiple connected outputs] I woke up around midnight with an urge to do some late night hacking, but I didn't want a bright monitor screwing up my body's circadian rhythm. I've heard that at night blue (short wavelength) lights are particularly bad for your diurnal clock. That may be a bunch of hooey, but it is true that redder (longer wavelength) colors are easier on my eyes at night. This command makes the screen dimmer and adjusts the gamma curves to improve contrast, particularly darkening blues and greens (Rɣ=2, Gɣ=3, Bɣ=4). To reset your screen to normal, you can run this command: $ xrandr | sed -n 's/ connected.*//p' | xargs -n1 -tri xrandr --output {} --brightness 1 --gamma 1:1:1 or, more briefly, $ xgamma -g 1 Note: The sed part is fragile and wrong. I'm doing it this way because of a misfeature in xrandr(1), which requires an output be specified but has no programmatic way of querying available outputs. Someone needs to patch up xrandr to be shell script friendly or at least add virtual outputs named "PRIMARY" and "ALL". . Todo: Screen should dim (gradually) at sunset and brighten at sunrise. I think this could be done with a self-resubmitting at job, but I'm running into the commandlinefu 127 character limit just getting the sunrise time: $ wget http://aa.usno.navy.mil/cgi-bin/aa_pap.pl --post-data=$(date "+xxy=%Y&xxm=%m&xxd=%d")"&st=WA&place=Seattle" -q -O- | sed -rn 's/\W*Sunrise\W*(.*)/\1/p' I hope some clever hacker comes up with a command line interface to Google's "OneBox", since the correct time shows up as the first hit when googling for "sunrise:cityname". . [Thank you to @flatcap for the sed improvement, which is much better than the head|tail|cut silliness I had before. And thank you to @braunmagrin for pointing out that the "connected" output may not be on the second line.]

grep binary (hexadecimal) patterns
-P activates the Perl regular expression mode.


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