Commands by m_a_xim (1)

  • The '[r]' is to avoid grep from grepping itself. (interchange 'r' by the appropriate letter) Here is an example that I use a lot (as root or halt will not work): while (ps -ef | grep [w]get); do sleep 10; done; sleep 60; halt I add the 'sleep 60' command just in case something went wrong; so that I have time to cancel. Very useful if you are going to bed while downloading something and do not want your computer running all night.


    -2
    while (ps -ef | grep [r]unning_program_name); do sleep 10; done; command_to_execute
    m_a_xim · 2010-01-14 16:26:34 0

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