Commands by maaz23 (0)

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Calculate days on which Friday the 13th occurs (inspired from the work of the user justsomeguy)
Friday is the 5th day of the week, monday is the 1st. Output may be affected by locale.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Remove security limitations from PDF documents using ghostscript
Remove security from PDF document using this very simple command on Linux and OSX. You need ghostscript for this baby to work.

Resume a partially copied file

shows the full path of shell commands

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Send a local file via email
Send it the easy way, with MIME and everything handled for you by an app that knows best.

monitor your CPU core temperatures in real time
Watch the temperatures of your CPU cores in real time at the command line. Press CONTROL+C to end. GORY DETAILS: Your computer needs to support sensors (many laptops, for example, do not). You'll need to install the lm-sensors package if it isn't already installed. And it helps to run the `sensors-detect` command to set up your sensor kernel modules first. At the very end of the sensors-detect interactive shell prompt, answer YES to add the new lines to the list of kernel modules loaded at boot.

Place the NUM-th argument of the most recent command on the shell
After executing a command with multiple arguments like cp ./temp/test.sh ~/prog/ifdown.sh you can paste any argument of the previous command to the console, like ls -l ALT+1+. is equivalent to ls -l ./temp/test.sh ALT+0+. stands for command itself ('ls' in this case) Simple ALT+. cycles through last arguments of previous commands.

Break lines after, for example 78 characters, but don't break within a word/string
Per default, linux/unix shells are configured with a width of 80 characters. If you like to edit a phrase or string on a line with more than 80 characters it might take long to go there (for example a line with 1000 characters and you like to edit the 98th word which is character 598-603). Maybe you might wish to use 78 characters, because if you forward the text via mail and the text will be quoted (2 extra characters at the beginning to the line "> "), you use 80 characters, otherwise 82, which are lame.


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