Commands by maccu (2)

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Sort file greater than a specified size in human readeable format including their path and typed by color, running from current directory
1. find file greater than 10 MB 2. direct it to xargs 3. xargs pass them as argument to ls

Paged, colored svn diff
I put this in a shell script called "svndiff", as it provides a handy decorated "svn diff" output that is colored (which you can't see here) and paged. The -r is required so less doesn't mangle the color codes.

Function to change prompt
Bash function to change your default prompt to something simpler and restore it to normal afterwards.

tunnel vnc port
Foward vnc securely from exampleserver.com

Brute force discover
Show the number of failed tries of login per account. If the user does not exist it is marked with *.

Get the total length of time in hours:minutes:seconds (HH:MM:SS) of all video (or audio) in the current dir (and below)
change the *.avi to whatever you want to match, you can remove it altogether if you want to check all files.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Check command history, but avoid running it
!whatever will search your command history and execute the first command that matches 'whatever'. If you don't feel safe doing this put :p on the end to print without executing. Recommended when running as superuser.

Remove blank lines from a file using grep and save output to new file


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