Commands by macoda (1)

  • parallel can be installed on your central node and can be used to run a command multiple times. In this example, multiple ssh connections are used to run commands. (-j is the number of jobs to run at the same time). The result can then be piped to commands to perform the "reduce" stage. (sort then uniq in this example). This example assumes "keyless ssh login" has been set up between the central node and all machines in the cluster. bashreduce may also do what you want. Show Sample Output


    1
    parallel -j 50 ssh {} "ls" ::: host1 host2 hostn | sort | uniq -c
    macoda · 2013-04-12 11:56:41 0

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