Commands by max (1)

  • Dumps a compressed svn backup to a file, and emails the files along with any messages as the body of the email


    1
    (svnadmin dump /path/to/repo | gzip --best > /tmp/svn-backup.gz) 2>&1 | mutt -s "SVN backup `date +\%m/\%d/\%Y`" -a /tmp/svn-backup.gz emailaddress
    max · 2010-03-08 05:49:01 0

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