Commands by mayurpant (2)

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restore the contents of a deleted file for which a descriptor is still available
Note that the file at the given path will have the contents of the (still) deleted file, but it is a new file with a new node number; in other words, this restores the data, but it does not actually "undelete" the old file. I posted a function declaration encapsulating this functionality to http://www.reddit.com/r/programming/comments/7yx6f/how_to_undelete_any_open_deleted_file_in_linux/c07sqwe (please excuse the crap formatting).

show framebuffer console modes to use in grub vga option
look at /boot/grub/menu.lst for somethig like: ## additional options to use with the default boot option, but not with the ## alternatives ## e.g. defoptions=vga=791 resume=/dev/hda5 ## defoptions=vga=795 # defoptions=vga=873 ## altoption boot targets option ## multiple altoptions lines are allowed ## e.g. altoptions=(extra menu suffix) extra boot options ## altoptions=(recovery) single # altoptions=(verbose mode) vga=775 debug # altoptions=(console mode) vga=ask # altoptions=(graphic mode) quiet splash # altoptions=(recovery mode) single vga=(decimal value) is framebuffer mode

Your GeoIP location on Google Maps

Undo several commits by committing an inverse patch.
Use this to make a new commit that "softly" reverts a branch to some commit (i.e. squashes the history into an inverse patch). You can review the changes first by doing the diff alone.

What is my ip?

port scan using parallel
It takes over 5 seconds to scan a single port on a single host using nmap $ time (nmap -p 80 192.168.1.1 &> /dev/null) real 0m5.109s user 0m0.102s sys 0m0.004s It took netcat about 2.5 minutes to scan port 80 on the class C $ time (for NUM in {1..255} ; do nc -w 1 -z -v 192.168.1.${NUM} 80 ; done &> /dev/null) real 2m28.651s user 0m0.136s sys 0m0.341s Using parallel, I am able to scan port 80 on the entire class C in under 2 seconds $ time (seq 1 255 | parallel -j255 'nc -w 1 -z -v 192.168.1.{} 80' &> /dev/null) real 0m1.957s user 0m0.457s sys 0m0.994s

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Sysadmin day date of any given year
Calculate the date of Sysadmin day (last Friday of July) of any given year

send substituted text to a command without echo, pipe
zsh only - This avoids the need for echo "message" | which creates an entire subshell. Also, the text you are most likely to edit is at the very end of the line, which, in my opinion, makes it slightly easier to edit.

Insert the last argument of the previous command
for example if you did a: $ ls -la /bin/ls then $ ls !$ is equivalent to doing a $ ls /bin/ls


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