Commands by mbander (1)

  • Let's say someone sends you a spreadsheet with a list of names (first name, last name) and needs the logon id of those users. Stick those names in a csv text file and let it fly. Show Sample Output


    0
    gc users.txt | %{get-aduser -filter "(givenname -eq '$($_.Split(",")[0])') -and (surname -eq '$($_.Split(",")[1])')"} | ft samaccountname,givenname,surname,enabled -auto
    mbander · 2015-03-17 16:41:55 0

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