Commands by mechmind (7)

  • It's useful mostly for your custom scripts, which running on specific host and tired on ssh'ing every time when you need one simple command (i use it for update remote apt repository, when new package have to be downloaded from another host). Don't forget to set up authorization by keys, for maximum comfort. Show Sample Output


    -3
    echo -e '#!/bin/bash\nssh remote-user@remote-host $0 "$@"' >> /usr/local/bin/ssh-rpc; chmod +x /usr/local/bin/ssh-rpc; ln -s hostname /usr/local/bin/ssh-rpc; hostname
    mechmind · 2011-12-28 17:43:34 5
  • There are a lot of commands, which invokes your player at specified time. But I prefer not to jump from by bed, when alarm start to play. Instead, this script increases volume of mpd over time, which much more pleasant when you just woke up :)


    7
    at 8:30 <<<'mpc volume 20; mpc play; for i in `seq 1 16`; do sleep 2; mpc volume +5; done'
    mechmind · 2011-11-30 17:51:27 1
  • this oneliner uses make and it's jobserver for parallel execution of your script. The '-j' flag for make defines number of subprocesses to launch, '-f' tells make use stdin instead of Makefile. Also make have neat flag '-l', which "Specifies that no new jobs (commands) should be started if there are others jobs running and the load is at least load (a floating-point number)." Also you can use plain Makefile, for better readability: targets = $(subst .png,.jpg,$(wildcard *.png)) (targets): echo convert $(subst .jpg,.png,$@) $@ all : $(targets)


    5
    echo -n 'targets = $(subst .png,.jpg,$(wildcard *.png))\n$(targets):\n convert $(subst .jpg,.png,$@) $@ \nall : $(targets)' | make -j 4 -f - all
    mechmind · 2010-07-15 07:19:17 1
  • USAGE: $ sudor your command This command uses a dirty hack with history, so be sure you not turned it off. WARNING! This command behavior differ from other commands. It more like text macro, so you shouldn't use it in subshells, non-interactive sessions, other functions/aliases and so on. You shouldn't pipe into sudor (any string that prefixes sudor will be removed), but if you really want, use this commands: proceed_sudo () { sudor_command="`HISTTIMEFORMAT=\"\" history 1 | sed -r -e 's/^.*?sudor//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`" ; pre_sudor_command="`history 1 | cut -d ' ' -f 5- | sed -r -e 's/sudor.*$//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`"; if [ -n "${pre_sudor_command/ */}" ] ; then eval "${pre_sudor_command%| *}" | sudo sh -c "$sudor_command"; else sudo sh -c "$sudor_command" ;fi ;}; alias sudor="proceed_sudo # "


    3
    proceed_sudo () { sudor_command="`HISTTIMEFORMAT=\"\" history 1 | sed -r -e 's/^.*?sudor//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`" ; sudo sh -c "$sudor_command"; }; alias sudor="proceed_sudo # "
    mechmind · 2010-06-29 14:56:29 0
  • For this hack you need following function: finit() { count=$#; current=1; for i in "$@" ; do echo $current $count; echo $i; current=$((current + 1)); done; } and alias: alias fnext='read cur total && echo -n "[$cur/$total] " && read' Inspired by CMake progress counters. Show Sample Output


    2
    finit "1 2 3" 3 2 1 | while fnext i ; do echo $i; done;
    mechmind · 2010-06-17 10:20:49 0
  • When you start screen as `ssh-agent screen`, agent will die after detatch. If you don't want to take care about files when stored agent's pid/socket/etc, you have to use this command.


    4
    eval `ssh-agent`; screen
    mechmind · 2010-03-07 14:58:54 0
  • With this form you dont need to cut out target directory using grep/sed/etc.


    4
    (ls; mkdir subdir; echo subdir) | xargs mv
    mechmind · 2009-11-08 11:40:55 5

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Make ISO image of a folder
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Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
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Displays the attempted user name, ip address, and time of SSH failed logins on Debian machines
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Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Convert CSV to JSON
Replace 'csv_file.csv' with your filename.

GREP a PDF file.
PDF files are simultaneously wonderful and heinous. They are wonderful in being ubiquitous and mostly being cross platform. They are heinous in being very difficult to work with from the command line, search, grep, use only the text inside the PDF, or use outside of proprietary products. xpdf is a wonderful set of PDF tools. It is on many linux distros and can be installed on OS X. While primarily an open PDF viewer for X, xpdf has the tool "pdftotext" that can extract formated or unformatted text from inside a PDF that has text. This text stream can then be further processed by grep or other tool. The '-' after the file name directs output to stdout rather than to a text file the same name as the PDF. Make sure you use version 3.02 of pdftotext or later; earlier versions clipped lines. The lines extracted from a PDF without the "-layout" option are very long. More paragraphs. Use just to test that a pattern exists in the file. With "-layout" the output resembles the lines, but it is not perfect. xpdf is available open source at http://www.foolabs.com/xpdf/

pulsed terminal clock
hypnotizing pendulum

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

Size(k) of directories(Biggest first)
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Cut/Copy everything arround brackets or parentheses on vim (in normal mode)
Put the cursor on either curly braces ( {, } ). Then press d% The d is delete command, and % is movement command that move the cursor to another matching parentheses (or curly braces in this case). This action will delete every character that was on the way of the movement (from the first curly braces to the second).


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