Commands by mechmind (7)

  • It's useful mostly for your custom scripts, which running on specific host and tired on ssh'ing every time when you need one simple command (i use it for update remote apt repository, when new package have to be downloaded from another host). Don't forget to set up authorization by keys, for maximum comfort. Show Sample Output


    -3
    echo -e '#!/bin/bash\nssh remote-user@remote-host $0 "$@"' >> /usr/local/bin/ssh-rpc; chmod +x /usr/local/bin/ssh-rpc; ln -s hostname /usr/local/bin/ssh-rpc; hostname
    mechmind · 2011-12-28 17:43:34 5
  • There are a lot of commands, which invokes your player at specified time. But I prefer not to jump from by bed, when alarm start to play. Instead, this script increases volume of mpd over time, which much more pleasant when you just woke up :)


    7
    at 8:30 <<<'mpc volume 20; mpc play; for i in `seq 1 16`; do sleep 2; mpc volume +5; done'
    mechmind · 2011-11-30 17:51:27 1
  • this oneliner uses make and it's jobserver for parallel execution of your script. The '-j' flag for make defines number of subprocesses to launch, '-f' tells make use stdin instead of Makefile. Also make have neat flag '-l', which "Specifies that no new jobs (commands) should be started if there are others jobs running and the load is at least load (a floating-point number)." Also you can use plain Makefile, for better readability: targets = $(subst .png,.jpg,$(wildcard *.png)) (targets): echo convert $(subst .jpg,.png,$@) $@ all : $(targets)


    5
    echo -n 'targets = $(subst .png,.jpg,$(wildcard *.png))\n$(targets):\n convert $(subst .jpg,.png,$@) $@ \nall : $(targets)' | make -j 4 -f - all
    mechmind · 2010-07-15 07:19:17 1
  • USAGE: $ sudor your command This command uses a dirty hack with history, so be sure you not turned it off. WARNING! This command behavior differ from other commands. It more like text macro, so you shouldn't use it in subshells, non-interactive sessions, other functions/aliases and so on. You shouldn't pipe into sudor (any string that prefixes sudor will be removed), but if you really want, use this commands: proceed_sudo () { sudor_command="`HISTTIMEFORMAT=\"\" history 1 | sed -r -e 's/^.*?sudor//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`" ; pre_sudor_command="`history 1 | cut -d ' ' -f 5- | sed -r -e 's/sudor.*$//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`"; if [ -n "${pre_sudor_command/ */}" ] ; then eval "${pre_sudor_command%| *}" | sudo sh -c "$sudor_command"; else sudo sh -c "$sudor_command" ;fi ;}; alias sudor="proceed_sudo # "


    3
    proceed_sudo () { sudor_command="`HISTTIMEFORMAT=\"\" history 1 | sed -r -e 's/^.*?sudor//' -e 's/\"/\\\"/g'`" ; sudo sh -c "$sudor_command"; }; alias sudor="proceed_sudo # "
    mechmind · 2010-06-29 14:56:29 0
  • For this hack you need following function: finit() { count=$#; current=1; for i in "$@" ; do echo $current $count; echo $i; current=$((current + 1)); done; } and alias: alias fnext='read cur total && echo -n "[$cur/$total] " && read' Inspired by CMake progress counters. Show Sample Output


    2
    finit "1 2 3" 3 2 1 | while fnext i ; do echo $i; done;
    mechmind · 2010-06-17 10:20:49 0
  • When you start screen as `ssh-agent screen`, agent will die after detatch. If you don't want to take care about files when stored agent's pid/socket/etc, you have to use this command.


    4
    eval `ssh-agent`; screen
    mechmind · 2010-03-07 14:58:54 0
  • With this form you dont need to cut out target directory using grep/sed/etc.


    4
    (ls; mkdir subdir; echo subdir) | xargs mv
    mechmind · 2009-11-08 11:40:55 5

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

vim insert current filename
insert filename Normal mode: "%p Insert mode: %

Remove ( color / special / escape / ANSI ) codes, from text, with sed
Remove ( color / special / escape / ANSI ) codes, from text, with sed Credit to the original folks who I've copied this command from. The diff here is: Theirs: [m|K] Theirs is supposed to remove \E[NUMBERS;NUMBERS[m OR K] This statement is incorrect in 2 ways. 1. The letters m and K are two of more than 20+ possible letters that can end these sequences. 2. Inside []'s , OR is already assumed, so they are also looking for sequences ending with | which is not correct. This : [a-zA-Z] This resolves the "OR" issue noted above, and takes care of all sequences, as they all end with a lower or upper cased letter. This ensures 100% of any escape code 'mess' is removed.

Get full directory path of a script regardless of where it is run from
Also resolves symlinks, showing the full path of the link target

Generate an XKCD #936 style 4 word password
The improvement of this command over Strawp's original alternative is that you can specify the size of the words, in this particular case words between 3 and 5 character's long. It also excludes words that contain apostrophes, if you'd rather keep those words simply substitue [^'] for .

Inverted cowsay
It's quite fun to invert text using "flip.pl" (ref: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=2078323 ). Slightly more challenging is to flip a whole "cowsay". :-)

detect partitions
`blkid` is an interface to libuuid - it can read Device Mapper, EVMS, LVM, MD, and regular block devices. -c /dev/null - Do not use cached output from /etc/blkid.tab or /etc/blkid/blkid.tab (RHEL) -i - Display I/O Limits (aka I/O topology) information (not available in RHEL) -p - Low-level superblock probing mode (not available in RHEL)

dump 1KB of data from ram to file

start a tunnel from some machine's port 80 to your local post 2001
now you can acces the website by going to http://localhost:2001/

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Rename files in batch


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: