Commands by mechmind (7)

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Find files that are older than x days
Find files that are older than x days in the working directory and list them. This will recurse all the sub-directories inside the working directory. By changing the value for -mtime, you can adjust the time and by replacing the ls command with, say, rm, you can remove those files if you wish to.

Resume aborted scp file transfers
Put it into your sh startup script (I use alias scpresume='rsync --partial --progress --rsh=ssh' in bash). When a file transfer via scp has aborted, just use scpresume instead of scp and rsync will copy only the parts of the file that haven't yet been transmitted.

Benchmark SQL Query
Benchmark a SQL query against MySQL Server. The example runs the query 10 times, and you get the average runtime in the output. To ensure that the query does not get cached, use `RESET QUERY CACHE;` on top in the query file.

Throttling Bandwidth On A Mac
sudo ipfw pipe 1 config bw 50KByte/s Set the bandwidth (bw) limit to any number you want. For example you could have a 15kb pipe for X application and then a 100kb pipe for another application and attach things to those pipes. If a port isn’t attached to a pipe, it runs at full speed. Change the number (in this case 1) to a different number for a different pipe. The next step is to attach your port. sudo ipfw add 1 pipe 1 src-port 80 In this case anything on port 80 (http) will be set to a limit of 50Kbyte/s. If you want to attach a second port to this pipe, repeat the command but change the port number at the end. src : http://www.mactricksandtips.com/2008/12/throttling-bandwidth-on-a-mac.html

Setting global redirection of STDERR to STDOUT in a script
You have a script where =ALL= STDERR should be redirected to STDIN and you don't want to add "2>&1" at the end of each command... E.G.: $ ls -al /foo/bar 2>&1 Than just add this piece of code at the beginning of your script! I hope this can help someone. :)

Get full from half remembered commands
Show all commands having the part known by you. Eg: $apropos pdf | less

World Cup Live Score
World Cup Live Score of the ongoing match. Alternative to have the live score with the match statistics: $ watch -n10 --no-title "w3m http://www.livescore.com/ |awk '/live [0-9H]+[^ ]/,/red cards/'"

Kill any process with one command using program name
This will kill all. e.g. killall firefox

Serve current directory tree at http://$HOSTNAME:8000/

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }


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