Commands by mikedamage (3)

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Create date based backups
This script creates date based backups of the files. It copies the files to the same place the original ones are but with an additional extension that is the timestamp of the copy on the following format: YearMonthDay-HourMinuteSecond

diff will usually only take one file from STDIN. This is a method to take the result of two streams and compare with diff. The example I use to compare two iTunes libraries but it is generally applicable.
diff is designed to compare two files. You can also compare directories. In this form, bash uses 'process substitution' in place of a file as an input to diff. Each input to diff can be filtered as you choose. I use find and egrep to select the files to compare.

Format partition with ext4 but without a journal
For slow flash memory (cheap thumb drive), ext4 is the fastest stable file system for all use cases with no relevant exception: http://www.linuxplanet.com/linuxplanet/tutorials/7208/1 Since we can usually dispense with the benefits of a journal for this type of storage, this is a way to achieve the least awful I/O-speed. Disabling the journal for an existing ext4 partition can be achieved using $ tune2fs -O ^has_journal /dev/sdXN Note that it is often recommended to format removable flash media with ext2, due to the lack of a journal. ext4 has many advantages over ext2 even without the journal, with much better speed as one of the consequences. So the only usecase for ext2 would be compatibility with very old software.

Update program providing a functionality on Debian
On Debian systems, choose which command provides java. Works for all alternatives listed in /etc/alternatives.

Edit the /etc/sudoers config file the right way.
'visudo' is installed by default on most Unix-like systems. If not installed, you can get it from the 'sudo' package. 'visudo' will use the text editor found in your $EDITOR variable, whether it's vi, vim, emacs, nano or gedit. After making changes to the /etc/sudoers file, visudo will check for syntax errors, and notify you of them. This is better than 'vi /etc/sudoers', because of this capability. Rule #1 of system administration- if there is a tool that exists for editing config files, use the tool.

Renames all files in the current directory such that the new file contains no space characters.
This is a better version, as it does no command piping, uses for instead of while loops, which allows for a list of files in the current working directory to be natively processed. It also uses the -v/verbose option with mv to let you know what the command is doing. While the command does exactly the same in a better way, I would modify the sed option to replace spaces with underscores instead, or dashes. Please note that you'll receive errors with this command as it tries to rename files that don't even have spaces. This is an alternative to: http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/8761/renames-all-files-in-the-current-directory-such-that-the-new-file-contains-no-space-characters.

Copy history from one terminal to another
Or just do history -w before opening another terminal.

Set name of windows in tmux/byobu to hostnames of servers you're connected to
*I run this with byobu as as a custom status bar entry that runs every 10 seconds by putting it in a script here: $ .byobu/bin/10_update_windows There's no output to stdout, so nothing is displayed on the status bar. *Presumes that #{pane_title} is set to the hostname or prompt containing the host name. In my case, it's in this format: $ [email protected]$HOSTNAME:$PWD The sed commands may need to be modified if your pane_title is different. *If you want to strip out a common part of a hostname, add the following before '| uniq' $ -e 's/[COMMON PART]//' I use that to strip out the domain of the servers I connect to, leaving the subdomain.

Block all IP addresses and domains that have attempted brute force SSH login to computer
Searches all log files (including archived bzip2 files) for invalid user and PAM authentication errors, both of which are indicative of brute force attempts at logging into computer. A list of all unique IP addresses and domain names is appended to hosts.deny. The command (and grep error messages) will work on Mac OS X 10.6, small adjustments may be needed for other OSs.

retrieve the source address used to contact a given host
on multihomed hosts, connected to several networks, could be usefull to know the source address (local ip address) used to reach the target host, this command does not require root priviledges. The command use a TCP socket, if there is any error the command return an empty string, elsewhere return a valid ip address.


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