Commands by mipmip (1)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

Find the real procesor speed when you use CPU scaling [cpuspeed]
We don't use CPU scaling, but just in case you do, there is something interesting to note. If you look at the /proc/cpuinfo, the speed listed is current running speed of the processors and not the real speed of the chip.

List all files/folders in working directory with their total size in Megabytes

Find files that have been modified on your system in the past 60 minutes
Useful mainly for debugging or troubleshooting an application or system, such as X11, Apache, Bind, DHCP and others. Another useful switch that can be combined with -mmin, -mtime and so forth is -daystart. For example, to find files that were modified in the /etc directory only yesterday: $ sudo find /etc -daystart -mtime 1 -type f

shell function to make gnu info act like man.
For those who hate navigating info pages, a shell function which will dump the contents to stdout, then page it through less, thus acting like 'man'.

list files recursively by size

Find the package that installed a command

Ping sweep without NMAP
Ping sweep without NMAP

use xxd to create the wake on lan magicpacket and write to pcap file
just set macdst to the mac address of the system you wish to wake up, the macsrc is optional but helps use tcpreplay to broadcast or wireshark to view

Expand shortened URLs
curl(1) is more portable than wget(1) across Unices, so here is an alternative doing the same thing with greater portability. This shell function uses curl(1) to show what site a shortened URL is pointing to, even if there are many nested shortened URLs. This is a great way to test whether or not the shortened URL is sending you to a malicious site, or somewhere nasty that you don't want to visit. The sample output is from: $ expandurl http://t.co/LDWqmtDM

Bash function that saves bash functions to file from shell session
The simpler, 1-arg version is save_function(){ { date +"# %F.%T $1; declare -f "$1";}| tee -a ~/.bash_functions; }`


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: