Commands by mislav (2)

  • Filters out all non-insert SQL operations (we couldn't filter out only lines starting with "INSERT" because inserts can span multiple lines), quotes table names with backticks, saves dump to a file and pipes it straight to mysql. This transfers only data--it expects your schema is already in place. In Ruby on Rails, you can easily recreate the schema in MySQL with "rake db:schema:load RAILS_ENV=production".


    0
    sqlite3 mydb.sqlite3 '.dump' | grep -vE '^(BEGIN|COMMIT|CREATE|DELETE)|"sqlite_sequence"' | sed -r 's/"([^"]+)"/`\1`/' | tee mydb.sql | mysql -p mydb
    mislav · 2009-10-02 14:40:51 0
  • No need to loop when we have `xargs`. The sed command filters out the first line of `show databases` output, which is always "Database".


    5
    mysql -e 'show databases' | sed -n '2,$p' | xargs -I DB 'mysqldump DB > DB.sql'
    mislav · 2009-09-25 08:43:06 5

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