Commands by mitre (0)

  • bash: commands not found

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list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

sed : using colons as separators instead of forward slashes
Having to escape forwardslashes when using sed can be a pain. However, it's possible to instead of using / as the separator to use : . I found this by trying to substitute $PWD into my pattern, like so $ sed "s/~.*/$PWD/" file.txt Of course, $PWD will expand to a character string that begins with a / , which will make sed spit out an error such as "sed: -e expression #1, char 8: unknown option to `s'". So simply changing it to $ sed "s:~.*:$PWD:" file.txt did the trick.

See your current RAM frequency
man dmidecode [look for type]

Create black and white image
Use ImageMagick to create a "black and white" copy of an image.

Plot frequency distribution of words from files on a terminal.
Uses the dumb terminal option in gnuplot to plot a graph of frequencies. In this case, we are looking at a frequency analysis of words in all of the .c files.

Set laptop display brightness
Run as root. Path may vary depending on laptop model and video card (this was tested on an Acer laptop with ATI HD3200 video). $ cat /proc/acpi/video/VGA/LCD/brightness to discover the possible values for your display.

Get the IP address
gives u each configured IP in a seperate line.

GZip all files in a directory separately
It gzip each file in a directory separately

Record active input of soundcard to file.wav
You'll need sox package in Debian/Ubuntu.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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