Commands by mniskin (1)

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Compute the average number of KB per file for each dir
Shorter version using --tag

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

List all PostgreSQL databases. Useful when doing backups

Recursive grep of all c++ source under the current directory
I like this better than some of the alternatives using -exec, because if I want to change the string, it's right there at the end of the command line. That means less editing effort and more time to drink coffee.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

find all files containing a pattern, open them using vi and place cursor to the first match, use 'n' and ':n' to navigate

Create an eicar.com test virus
Test whether real-time virus detection is working by running this command and checking for eicar.com in /tmp. Requires real-time scanning to be enabled and active on the /tmp directory. If scanning is active, the file should be quarantined/deleted (depending on your settings) moments after running this command. If not, the (harmless) test file should remain in your /tmp directory.

Shows physically connected drives (SCSI or SATA)
This will show all physically connected SATA (and SCSI) drives on your system. This is particularly useful when troubleshooting hard disks.... or when a mount point seems to be missing.

infile search and replace on N files (including backup of the files)
the addition of ".bk" to the regular "pie" idiom makes perl create a backup of every file with the extension ".bk", in case it b0rks something and you want it back


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