Commands by mobilediesel (2)

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Virtualbox rsync copy (without defining any virtualbox configuration)
That is, after running `vagrant ssh-config` to determine ports and ip's: $ vagrant ssh-config Host default HostName 127.0.0.1 User vagrant Port 2200 UserKnownHostsFile /dev/null StrictHostKeyChecking no PasswordAuthentication no IdentityFile /Users/romanvg/tmp/.vagrant/machines/default/virtualbox/private_key IdentitiesOnly yes LogLevel FATAL

continuously check size of files or directories

Get a free shell account on a community server
Bash process substitution which curls the website 'hashbang.sh' and executes the shell script embedded in the page. This is obviously not the most secure way to run something like this, and we will scold you if you try. The smarter way would be: Download locally over SSL > curl https://hashbang.sh >> hashbang.sh Verify integrty with GPG (If available) > gpg --recv-keys 0xD2C4C74D8FAA96F5 > gpg --verify hashbang.sh Inspect source code > less hashbang.sh Run > chmod +x hashbang.sh > ./hashbang.sh

move a lot of files over ssh
copy files to a ssh server with gzip compression

find sparse files
Prints the path/filename and sparseness of any sparse files (files that use less actual space than their total size because the filesystem treats large blocks of 00 bytes efficiently).

batch crop images whit ImageMagick
Just starting to get in love with mogrify.

find file/dir by excluding some unwanted dirs and filesystems
Consider using this cmd when: 1. You are planning to traverse a big directory. 2. There is a subdir you don't want find to decend to. (entirely ignore) 3. You don't want find to decend to any mounted filesystems under this dir. * The -xdev flag tells find do not go to other filesystems. * -path ./junk_dir -prune is the pattern to ignore ./junk_dir entirely. * The rest is the typical search and print. To ignore multiple subdirs, you can just iterate the pattern, e.g. find . -path ./junk1 -prune -o -path ./junk2 -prune ... If you do want to include other filesystems, then remove -xdev flag. If you want to search files, then change -type d to -type f.

Multi-thread any command
For instance: $ find . -type f -name '*.wav' -print0 |xargs -0 -P 3 -n 1 flac -V8 will encode all .wav files into FLAC in parallel. Explanation of xargs flags: -P [max-procs]: Max number of invocations to run at once. Set to 0 to run all at once [potentially dangerous re: excessive RAM usage]. -n [max-args]: Max number of arguments from the list to send to each invocation. -0: Stdin is a null-terminated list. I use xargs to build parallel-processing frameworks into my scripts like the one here: http://pastebin.com/1GvcifYa

Export all Mailman mailing lists Members to separate .txt files
Export all Mailman mailing lists Members to separate .txt files excluding "Mailman" and "Test" or add yours by && $1!="myDontWannaList"

Find unused IPs on a given subnet


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