Commands by mossholderm (1)

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tar and bz2 a set of folders as individual files
This version will work if "*screenflow" returns any results with weird characters, and will actually compress the tarballs.

Easy Persistent SSH Connections Using Screen
Use as: $ s host1 Will ssh to remote host upon first invocation. Then use C-a d to detatch. Running "s host1" again will resume the shell session on the remote host. Only useful in LAN environment. You'd want to start the screen on the remote host over a WAN. Adapted from Hack 34 in Linux Server Hacks 2nd Addition.

Open the current project on Github by typing gh
Written for Mac OSX. When you are working in a project and want to open it on Github.com, just type "gh" and your default browser will open with the repo you are in. Works for submodules, and repo's that you don't own. You'll need to copy / paste this command into a gh.sh file, then create an alias in your bash or zsh profile to the gh.sh script. Detailed instructions here if you still need help: http://gist.github.com/1917716

Copy with progress

Update all packages installed via homebrew

Recursively compare two directories and output their differences on a readable format

How To Get the Apache Document Root

live ssh network throughput test
connects to host via ssh and displays the live transfer speed, directing all transferred data to /dev/null needs pv installed Debian: 'apt-get install pv' Fedora: 'yum install pv' (may need the 'extras' repository enabled)

list directories only

a trash function for bash
Every rm'ed a file you needed? Of course you haven't. But I have. I got sick of it so I created a bash function. Here it is. It'll put trashed files into a $HOME/.Trash/"date" folder according to the date. I have rm aliased to it as well in my bashrc so that I still use the rm command. It'll choke if you attempt to trash a directory if that directory name is already in the Trash. This rarely happens in my case but it's easy enough to add another test and to mv the old dir if necessary. function trash(){ if [ -z "$*" ] ; then echo "Usage: trash filename" else DATE=$( date +%F ) [ -d "${HOME}/.Trash/${DATE}" ] || mkdir -p ${HOME}/.Trash/${DATE} for FILE in [email protected] ; do mv "${FILE}" "${HOME}/.Trash/${DATE}" echo "${FILE} trashed!" done fi }


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