Commands by msh (1)

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list files recursively by size

Make vim open in tabs by default (save to .profile)
I always add this to my .profile rc so I can do things like: "vim *.c" and the files are opened in tabs.

Stream YouTube URL directly to mplayer.

Quickly share code or text from vim to others.
Sprunge.us is a code/text sharing site like pastebin, but it is easy to post stuff from the command line. $ How it works: $ :w !command In vim, w writes the current tab to a file when a filename is given afterwards, but if !command is given, the output is piped to the stdin of command. $curl -F "sprunge=

Skype conversation logs to IRC-format logs

Recurse through directories easily
This is a simple case of recursing through all directories, adding the '.bak' extension to every file. Of course, the 'cp $file $file.bak' could be any code you need to apply to your recursion, including tests, other functions, creating variables, doing math, etc. Simple and clean recursion.

Search commandlinefu.com from the command line using the API
for me the above command didn't work for more than one argument but this one does

Show a Package Version on Debian based distribution
if you don't want to show string "version?, then use awk or cut filter it: apt-cache show pkgname | grep -i "version:" | awk '{ print $2 }' we can also use regex to search many packages and show their versions: apt-cache search pkgregex | grep -i "version:"

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.


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