Commands by mungewell (4)

  • converts any number on the 'stdin' to SI notation. My version limits to 3 digits of precious (working with 10% resistors). Show Sample Output


    2
    $ awk '{ split(sprintf("%1.3e", $1), b, "e"); p = substr("yzafpnum_kMGTPEZY", (b[2]/3)+9, 1); o = sprintf("%f", b[1] * (10 ^ (b[2]%3))); gsub(/\./, p, o); print substr( gensub(/_[[:digit:]]*/, "", "g", o), 1, 4); }' < test.dat
    mungewell · 2009-07-22 16:54:14 5
  • GNU Sed can 'address' between two regex, but it continues parsing through to the end of the file. This slight alteration causes it to terminate reading the input file once the STOP match is made. In my example I have included an extra '/START/d' as my 'start' marker line contains the 'stop' string (I'm extracting data between 'resets' and using the time stamp as the 'start'). My previous coding using grep is slightly faster near the end of the file, but overall (extracting all the reset cycles in turn) the new SED method is quicker and a lot neater. Show Sample Output


    3
    sed -n '/START/,${/STOP/q;p}'
    mungewell · 2009-06-19 15:27:36 1
  • I've been auto-generating some complex GnuPlots; with multiplots the first plot of each group needs to be a 'plot' whereas the others need to be 'replots' to allow overplotting/autoscaling/etc to work properly. This is used to replace only the first instance of 'replot'. Show Sample Output


    5
    sed '/MARKER/{N;s/THIS/THAT/}'
    mungewell · 2009-06-12 02:29:50 0
  • Sometimes jittery data hides trends, performing a rolling average can give a clearer view.


    3
    awk 'BEGIN{size=5} {mod=NR%size; if(NR<=size){count++}else{sum-=array[mod]};sum+=$1;array[mod]=$1;print sum/count}' file.dat
    mungewell · 2009-05-29 00:07:24 0

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Ultimate current directory usage command
An NCurses version of the famous old 'du' unix command

Reinstall Grub

prints line numbers
the sed way to print line numbers

get stdout to variable and stdout at sametime
Sometimes you want to write the script output to stdout but you need to send it to email. If you use: $ var="$( ls / )"; $ echo -e "$var"; works but, you need to wait the script terminate to bufferize then print the output var; With this way, you can use/work/print the output before the variable receive all the output content, then after it you can use the variable for anything else, like send email.

Create a random file of a specific size
This will create a 10 MB file named testfile.txt. Change the count parameter to change the size of the file. As one commenter pointed out, yes /dev/random can be used, but the content doesn't matter if you just need a file of a specific size for testing purposes, which is why I used /dev/zero. The file size is what matters, not the content. It's 10 MB either way. "Random" just referred to "any file - content not specific"

Synthesize text as speech
The Festival Speech Synthesis System converts text into sound. Or: links -dump http://youfavoritewebsite.com | festival --tts

Create a new file

Display all shell functions set in the current shell environment
Uses the shell builtin `declare` with the '-f' flag to output only functions to grep out only the function names. You can use it as an alias or function like so: alias shfunctions="builtin declare -f | command grep --color=never -E '^[a-zA-Z_]+\ \(\)'" shfunctions () { builtin declare -f | command grep --color=never -E '^[a-zA-Z_]+\ \(\)'; }

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

Processor / memory bandwidthd? in GB/s
Read 32GB zero's and throw them away. How fast is your system?


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