Commands by mungewell (4)

  • converts any number on the 'stdin' to SI notation. My version limits to 3 digits of precious (working with 10% resistors). Show Sample Output


    2
    $ awk '{ split(sprintf("%1.3e", $1), b, "e"); p = substr("yzafpnum_kMGTPEZY", (b[2]/3)+9, 1); o = sprintf("%f", b[1] * (10 ^ (b[2]%3))); gsub(/\./, p, o); print substr( gensub(/_[[:digit:]]*/, "", "g", o), 1, 4); }' < test.dat
    mungewell · 2009-07-22 16:54:14 5
  • GNU Sed can 'address' between two regex, but it continues parsing through to the end of the file. This slight alteration causes it to terminate reading the input file once the STOP match is made. In my example I have included an extra '/START/d' as my 'start' marker line contains the 'stop' string (I'm extracting data between 'resets' and using the time stamp as the 'start'). My previous coding using grep is slightly faster near the end of the file, but overall (extracting all the reset cycles in turn) the new SED method is quicker and a lot neater. Show Sample Output


    3
    sed -n '/START/,${/STOP/q;p}'
    mungewell · 2009-06-19 15:27:36 1
  • I've been auto-generating some complex GnuPlots; with multiplots the first plot of each group needs to be a 'plot' whereas the others need to be 'replots' to allow overplotting/autoscaling/etc to work properly. This is used to replace only the first instance of 'replot'. Show Sample Output


    5
    sed '/MARKER/{N;s/THIS/THAT/}'
    mungewell · 2009-06-12 02:29:50 0
  • Sometimes jittery data hides trends, performing a rolling average can give a clearer view.


    3
    awk 'BEGIN{size=5} {mod=NR%size; if(NR<=size){count++}else{sum-=array[mod]};sum+=$1;array[mod]=$1;print sum/count}' file.dat
    mungewell · 2009-05-29 00:07:24 0

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Run netcat to server files of current folder

Write comments to your history.
A null operation with the name 'comment', allowing comments to be written to HISTFILE. Prepending '#' to a command will *not* write the command to the history file, although it will be available for the current session, thus '#' is not useful for keeping track of comments past the current session.

Remove security limitations from PDF documents using ghostscript (for Windows)
#4345 also works under windows

output length of longest line
If your wc does not have the -L option, you can use awk.

grep (or anything else) many files with multiprocessor power
xargs -P N spawns up to N worker processes. -n 40 means each grep command gets up to 40 file names each on the command line.

Change tha mac adresse
eth0 = the name of the interface 00:01:02:03:04:05 = the new mac adresse the same thing for wireless card $ sudo iwconfig eth1 hw ether 00:01:02:03:04:05

Find the package that installed a command

Speed up upgrades for a debian/ubuntu based system.
Please install aria2c before you try the above command. On ubuntu the command to install aria2c would be: $sudo aptitude install aria2

Get yesterday's date or a previous time
With this command you can get a previous or future date or time. Where can you use this? How about finding all files modified or created in the last 5 mins? touch -t `echo $(date -d "5 minute ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type f -newer me List all directories created since last week? touch -t `echo $(date -d "1 week ago" "+%G%m%d%H%M.%S")` me && find . -type d -cnewer me I'm sure you can think of more ways to use it. Requires coreutils package.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"


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