Commands by n0ky75 (0)

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Search at CommandLineFu.com from your terminal. Get the clfu-seach at http://www.colivre.coop.br/Aurium/CLFUSearch

Rebuild a Delimited File with a Unique Delimiter
Useful for CSV files. In the command, the file in question is comma delimited but contains double quoted fields containing commas and contains no @ symbols (as confirmed with http://www.commandlinefu.com/commands/view/9998/delimiter-hunting). This command converts the delimiting commas to @s while preserving the commas in the fields using the "uniqueString" to mark the ends of lines.

Convert JSON to YAML
Requires installing json2yaml via npm: npm install -g json2yaml (can also pipe from stdin) Ref: https://www.npmjs.com/package/json2yaml

A rainbow-colored Tux gives a fortune cookie for the day. Great

Slow down IO heavy process
Some IO intensive process make the system unresponsive. This function periodically starts/stops a process, which hopefully releases some resources for other activities. This function is useful when ionice is not available

Read and write to TCP or UDP sockets with common bash tools
Ever needed to test firewalls but didn't have netcat, telnet or even FTP? Enter /dev/tcp, your new best friend. /dev/tcp/(hostname)/(port) is a bash builtin that bash can use to open connections to TCP and UDP ports. This one-liner opens a connection on a port to a server and lets you read and write to it from the terminal. How it works: First, exec sets up a redirect for /dev/tcp/$server/$port to file descriptor 5. Then, as per some excellent feedback from @flatcap, we launch a redirect from file descriptor 5 to STDOUT and send that to the background (which is what causes the PID to be printed when the commands are run), and then redirect STDIN to file descriptor 5 with the second cat. Finally, when the second cat dies (the connection is closed), we clean up the file descriptor with 'exec 5>&-'. It can be used to test FTP, HTTP, NTP, or can connect to netcat listening on a port (makes for a simple chat client!) Replace /tcp/ with /udp/ to use UDP instead.

Route outbound SMTP connections through a addtional IP address rather than your primary

Shows physically connected drives (SCSI or SATA)
This will show all physically connected SATA (and SCSI) drives on your system. This is particularly useful when troubleshooting hard disks.... or when a mount point seems to be missing.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

send tweets to twitter (and get user details)
great for outputting tweets from cron jobs and batch scripts


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