Commands by nanexcool (1)

What's this?

commandlinefu.com is the place to record those command-line gems that you return to again and again. That way others can gain from your CLI wisdom and you from theirs too. All commands can be commented on, discussed and voted up or down.

Share Your Commands


Check These Out

How to remove an ISO image from media database

Super Speedy Hexadecimal or Octal Calculations and Conversions to Decimal.
^Hexadecimal Ten minus Octal Ten is Eight(in Decimal). $ echo "$(( 0xaf )) = $(( 0257 ))" ^Hexadecimal AF and Octal 257 are both Decimal 175.

Copy stdin to your X11 buffer
Have you ever had to scp a file to your work machine in order to copy its contents to a mail? xclip can help you with that. It copies its stdin to the X11 buffer, so all you have to do is middle-click to paste the content of that looong file :)

Check syntax of all Perl modules or scripts underneath the current directory
Finds all *.p[ml]-files and runs a perl -c on them, checking whether Perl thinks they are syntactically correct

Count the number of man pages per first character (a-z)
There once was a day I needed this info.

escape any command aliases
e.g. if rm is aliased for 'rm -i', you can escape the alias by prepending a backslash: rm [file] # WILL prompt for confirmation per the alias \rm [file] # will NOT prompt for confirmation per the default behavior of the command

convert single digit to double digits
Uses 'rename' to pad zeros in front of first existing number in each filename. The "--" is not required, but it will prevent errors on filenames which start with "-". You can change the "2d" to any number you want, equaling the total numeric output: aka, 4d = ????, 8d = ????????, etc. I setup a handful of handy functions to this effect (because I couldn't figure out how to insert a var for the value) in the form of 'padnum?', such as: padnum5 () { /usr/bin/rename 's/\d+/sprintf("%05d",$&)/e' -- $@ } Which would change a file "foo-1.txt" to "foo-00001.txt"

Jump to a directory, execute a command and jump back to current dir

Synchronise a file from a remote server
You will be prompted for a password unless you have your public keys set-up.

Mac OS X: remove extra languages to save over 3 GB of space.
This will get the job done in the most efficient way - spawning only one `rm` process. "On-the-fly" find data is displayed through `tee` and you should have plenty of time to ctrl-c if needed before it's too late. You may need to re-run this after major Software Updates. To leave more languages in, add more ``-and \! -iname "lang*"'' statements: $ sudo find / -iname "*.lproj" -and \! -iname "en*" -and \! -iname "spanish*" -print0 | tee /dev/stderr | sudo xargs -0 rm -rfv **Edit: note the 2nd sudo near the end of the pipeline - this is necessary.


Stay in the loop…

Follow the Tweets.

Every new command is wrapped in a tweet and posted to Twitter. Following the stream is a great way of staying abreast of the latest commands. For the more discerning, there are Twitter accounts for commands that get a minimum of 3 and 10 votes - that way only the great commands get tweeted.

» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu3
» http://twitter.com/commandlinefu10

Subscribe to the feeds.

Use your favourite RSS aggregator to stay in touch with the latest commands. There are feeds mirroring the 3 Twitter streams as well as for virtually every other subset (users, tags, functions,…):

Subscribe to the feed for: