Commands by nesses (3)

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Produces a list of when your domains expire
Create a text file called domainlist.txt with a domain per line, then run the command above. All registries are a little different, so play around with the command. Should produce a list of domains and their expirations date. I am responsible for my companies domains and have a dozen or so myself, so this is a quick check if I overlooked any.

Show the disk usage for files pointed by symbolic link in a directory
You also can sum the file usage of all files $ find /usr/lib -maxdepth 1 -type l -print0 | xargs -r0 du -Lch

Kill any lingering ssh processes

vim's pastetoggle: when you press f9 'paste' is on , press f9 again and 'paste' is off, and so forth (works in insert-mode and command-mode)

FizzBuzz in one line of Bash
The (in)famous "FizzBuzz" programming challenge, answered in a single line of Bash code. The "|column" part at the end merely formats the output a bit, so if "column" is not installed on your machine you can simply omit that part. Without "|column", the solution only uses 75 characters. The version below is expanded to multiple lines, with comments added. for i in {1..100} # Use i to loop from "1" to "100", inclusive. do ((i % 3)) && # If i is not divisible by 3... x= || # ...blank out x (yes, "x= " does that). Otherwise,... x=Fizz # ...set x to the string "Fizz". ((i % 5)) || # If i is not divisible by 5, skip (there's no "&&")... x+=Buzz # ...Otherwise, append (not set) the string "Buzz" to x. echo ${x:-$i} # Print x unless it is blanked out. Otherwise, print i. done | column # Wrap output into columns (not part of the test).

Create QR codes from a URL.
QR codes are those funny square 2d bar codes that everyone seems to be pointing their smart phones at. Try the following... $ qrurl http://xkcd.com Then open qr.*.png in your favorite image viewer. Point your the bar code reader on your smart phone at the code, and you'll shortly be reading xkcd on your phone. URLs are not the only thing that can be encoded by QR codes... short texts (to around 2K) can be encoded this way, although this function doesn't do any URL encoding, so unless you want to do that by hand it won't be useful for that.

Restrict the use of dmesg for current user/session
Linux offers an interesting option to restrict the use of dmesg. It is available via /proc/sys/kernel/dmesg_restrict. You can check the status with: $ cat /proc/sys/kernel/dmesg_restrict Alternatively you can use sysctl: $ sudo sysctl -w kernel.dmesg_restrict=1 To make your change persistent across reboot, edit a fille in /etc/sysctl.d/.

Create a single PDF from multiple images with ImageMagick
Given some images (jpg or other supported formats) in input, you obtain a single PDF file with an image for every page.

Sed can refference parts of the pattern in the replacement:

Remove color codes (special characters) with sed


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