Commands by ngocmai (0)

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Kill any process with one command using program name
See also: killall

Recursively find top 20 largest files (> 1MB) sort human readable format
Search for files and list the 20 largest. $ find . -type f gives us a list of file, recursively, starting from here (.) $ -print0 | xargs -0 du -h separate the names of files with NULL characters, so we're not confused by spaces then xargs run the du command to find their size (in human-readable form -- 64M not 64123456) $ | sort -hr use sort to arrange the list in size order. sort -h knows that 1M is bigger than 9K $ | head -20 finally only select the top twenty out of the list

Visualizing system performance data

Bash prompt with user name, host, history number, current dir and just a touch of color
I put that line in my .bash_profile (OS X) and .bashrc (Linux). Here is a summary of what the \char means: n=new line, u=user name, h=host, !=history number, w=current work directory The \[\e[32m\] sequence set the text to bright green and \[\e[0m\] returns to normal color. For more information on what you can set in your bash prompt, google 'bash prompt'

Print without executing the last command that starts with...
It happens that sometime you remember that you used a special command short time before and you want to check the command again. WIth this command you can just put the beginning of a command and then bash will look for you and it will print back safely withou executing

Google URL shortener
use curl and sed to shorten an url via goo.gl

Show a curses based menu selector
Not so much handy by itself, but very nice in shell scripts. This makes you a handy ncurses based checklist. Much like terminal installers, just use the arrow keys and hit 'Space' to adjust the selections. Returns all selected tags as strings, with no newline at the end. So, your output will be something like: "one" "two" "three" "four" "etc" For those who prefer bash expansion over gratuitious typing: $ whiptail --checklist "Simple checkbox menu" 12 35 3 $(echo {one,two,three,four}" '' 0"} ) Things to note: The height must includes the outer border and padding: add 7 to however many items you want to show up at the same time. If the status is 1, it will be selected by default. anything else, will be deselected.

Test a SSLv2 connection
Test for weak SSL version.

Remove all .svn folders
With the plus instead of semicolon, find builds the (eg.) rm command like xargs does - invokes as few extra processes as possible.

Detect illegal access to kernel space, potentially useful for Meltdown detection
Based on capsule8 agent examples, not rigorously tested


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