Commands by nickleus (9)


  • 5
    for f in *;do flac -cd $f |lame -b 192 - $f.mp3;done
    nickleus · 2010-10-19 07:55:11 0
  • i have a large video file, 500+ MB, so i cant upload it to flickr, so to reduce the size i split it into 2 files. the command shows the splitting for the first file, from 0-4 minutes. ss is start time and t is duration (how long you want the output file to be). credit goes to philc: http://ubuntuforums.org/showthread.php?t=480343 NOTE: when i made the second half of the video, i got a *lot* of lines like this: frame= 0 fps= 0 q=0.0 size= 0kB time=10000000000.00 bitrate= 0.0kbit just be patient, it is working =) Show Sample Output


    2
    ffmpeg -i 100_0029.MOV -ss 00:00:00 -t 00:04:00 100_0029_1.MOV
    nickleus · 2010-08-08 23:43:28 0
  • if you haven't already done so, install lame and flac: sudo apt-get install lame flac Show Sample Output


    2
    flac -cd input.flac |lame -h - output.mp3
    nickleus · 2010-03-05 23:54:21 1
  • if you still get a permissions error using sudo, then nano the file: sudo nano -w /sys/block/sdb/queue/rotational and change 1 to 0 this thread: http://www.ocztechnologyforum.com/forum/showpost.php?p=369836&postcount=15 says that this will "help the block layer to optimize a few decisions"


    5
    sudo echo 0 > /sys/block/sdb/queue/rotational
    nickleus · 2009-11-27 12:16:17 5
  • The iostat command is used for monitoring system input/output device loading by observing the time the devices are active in relation to their average transfer rates. in ubuntu to get the iostat program do this: sudo apt-get install sysstat i found this command here: http://www.ocztechnologyforum.com/forum/showthread.php?t=54379 Show Sample Output


    3
    iostat -m -d /dev/sda1
    nickleus · 2009-11-27 12:00:48 2
  • why would you want to convert mp3's to ogg? 1 reason is because ardour doesn't support mp3 files because of legal issues. this is really the only reason you would do this, unless you have really bad hearing and also want smaller file sizes, because converting from one lossy format to another isn't a good idea. Show Sample Output


    -1
    mp32ogg file.mp3
    nickleus · 2009-11-16 20:22:48 2
  • cd to the folder containing the wav files and convert them all to ogg format. in my sample output i use the -a and -l flags to set the author and album title. to get the oggenc program in ubuntu linux run: sudo apt-get install oggenc Show Sample Output


    2
    oggenc *.wav
    nickleus · 2009-11-11 14:26:01 3
  • cd to the folder containing the wav files, then convert them all to flac. yeah baby! in ubuntu, to get the flac program just: sudo apt-get install flac flac file input formats are wav, aiff, raw, flac, oga and ogg Show Sample Output


    3
    flac --best *.wav
    nickleus · 2009-11-11 14:17:24 6
  • search ubuntu's remote package source repositories for a specific program to see which package contains it Show Sample Output


    7
    apt-file find bin/programname
    nickleus · 2009-11-10 10:21:45 2

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