Commands by nicolesmith1 (0)

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Automatically find and re-attach to a detached screen session
man screen: "-D -R Attach here and now. In detail this means: If a session is running, then reattach. If necessary detach and logout remotely first. If it was not running create it and notify the user. This is the author?s favorite."

Extract title from HTML files
This command can be used to extract the title defined in HTML pages

Pick a random line from a file

list all opened ports on host
in loop, until the last port (65535), list all opened ports on host. in the sample I used localhost, but you can replace with any host to test.

Print a row of characters across the terminal
Pure Bash This will print a row of characters the width of the screen without using any external executables. In some cases, COLUMNS may not be set. Here is an alternative that uses tput to generate a default if that's the case. And it still avoids using tr. $ printf -v row "%${COLUMNS:-$(tput cols)}s"; echo ${row// /#} The only disadvantage to either one is that they create a variable.

list block devices
Shows all block devices in a tree with descruptions of what they are.

Quickly re-execute a recent command in bash
! will expand to the last time you ran , options and all. It's a nicer alternative to ^R for simple cases, and it's quite helpful for those long commands you run every now and then and haven't made aliases or functions for. It's similar to command 3966, in some sense.

Play all files in the directory using MPlayer
Skip forward and back using the < and > keys. Display the file title with I.

Tricky implementation of two-dimensional array in Bash.
Since Bash doesn't support two-dimensional arrays, you can limit your columns length by some big enough constant value ( in this example 100 ) and then index the array with i and j, or maybe write your own get() and set() methods to index the array properly like I implemented for example ( see Sample output ). For example for i=0 and j=0...99 you'll pick up one of 100 elements in the range [0,99] in the one-dimensional array. For i=1 and j=0...99 you'll pick up one of 100 elements in the range [100,199]. And so on. Be careful when using this, and remember that in fact you are always using one-dimensional array.

open remote desktop connection without X
You can use it to connect to remote windows machine and start some scritps that need user login


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