Commands by nimmylebby (1)

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This is N5 sorta like rot13 but with numbers only
This is N5 sorta like rot13 but with numbers only. Encrypt echo "$1" | xxd -p | tr '0-9' '5-90-6' Decrypt echo "$1" | tr '0-9' '5-90-6' | xxd -r -p

Finding files with different extensions
This is the way how you can find header and cpp files in the same time.

Synchronise a file from a remote server
You will be prompted for a password unless you have your public keys set-up.

save command output to image

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

split a multi-page PDF into separate files
Have to do this once per output file, because if device is 'pdfwrite', even if 'gs' sees '%d' in the OutputFile it still only creates one single output file. Embed it into a simple shell script if you want to split a document out into one file for every page.

Number of open connections per ip.
Here is a command line to run on your server if you think your server is under attack. It prints our a list of open connections to your server and sorts them by amount. BSD Version: $ netstat -na |awk '{print $5}' |cut -d "." -f1,2,3,4 |sort |uniq -c |sort -nr

Commandline document conversion with Libreoffice
In this example, the docx gets converted to Open Document .odt format. For other formats, you'll need to specify the correct filter (Hint: see "Comments" link below for a nice list).

Quick case-insenstive partial filename search
This is a simple command, but extremely useful. It's a quick way to search the file names in the current directory for a substring. Normally people use "ls *term*" but that requires the stars and is not case insensitive. Color (for both ls and grep) is an added bonus.

Find the package that installed a command


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