Commands by odoepner (8)

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get all bookmarks from all profiles from firefox
for i in $(ls /home/marco/.mozilla/firefox/*\.*/places.sqlite); do sqlite3 $i "SELECT strftime('%d.%m.%Y %H:%M:%S', dateAdded/1000000, 'unixepoch', 'localtime'),url FROM moz_places, moz_bookmarks WHERE moz_places.id = moz_bookmarks.fk ORDER BY dateAdded;"; done

Clean up poorly named TV shows.
Replace 'SHOWNAME' with the name of the TV show. Add -n to test the command without renaming files. Check the 'sample output'.

cycle through everything sox knows how to read, playing only the first three seconds
I wasted two hours reading the sox documentation and searching on the web for the format of some obscure fscking sound sample, and then finally came up with this. This plays only the first three seconds of your unknown formatted sound file using every one of sox's built-in filetypes. If you don't get an exact match, you may get close. . I could not fit every single type in and keep it under 127 characters, so you will have to replace "..." with the full list obtainable by `$ sox --help` (or try `Show sample output`) . note: /usr/bin/play should be linked to sox on most systems.

Tell Analytics to fuck itself.
See http://code.google.com/apis/analytics/docs/concepts/gaConceptsCookies.html if you are unclear about the Google Analytics cookie system. If Firefox is your daily browser, be a good Orwellian and run this command regularly. If you see, 'SQL error near line 1: database is locked', close Firefox and run again.

Convert files from DOS line endings to UNIX line endings
Here "^M" is NOT "SHIFT+6" and "M". Type CTRL+V+M to get it instead. Its shortest and easy. And its sed!, which is available by default in all linux flavours.. no need to install extra tools like fromdos.

Display which user run process from given port name
Display which user run process from given port name

Search command history on bash
Very handy and time-saving. Do a 'ctrl+ r' on command prompt. You will see a "(reverse-i-search)`':" mark. Just type any sub-string of the command you want to search(provided you have used it sometime in the same session). Keep on searching by repeatedly pressing ctrl+r. Press enter once you get the desired command string.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Enter parameter if empty (script becomes interactive when parameters are missing)
Can be used for command line parameters too. If you have a more complicated way of entering values (validation, GUI, ...), then write a function i.e. EnterValue() that echoes the value and then you can write: $ param=${param:-$(EnterValue)}

Sum file sizes
Even simpler! Use du ... the -s and -c flags summarize and print a grand total of all files recursively. The -b flag prints in byte format. You can use the -h flag instead to print in human readable format.


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