Commands by oscardelben (0)

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Remove a line from a file using sed (useful for updating known SSH server keys when they change)
remove the host for the .ssh/know_host file

Create a mirror of a local folder, on a remote server
Create a exact mirror of the local folder "/root/files", on remote server 'remote_server' using SSH command (listening on port 22) (all files & folders on destination server/folder will be deleted)

Download all data from Google Ngram Viewer
To learn more about Google Ngram Viewer: http://ngrams.googlelabs.com/info

delete PBS jobs based on strings from qstat output

Create an eicar.com test virus
Test whether real-time virus detection is working by running this command and checking for eicar.com in /tmp. Requires real-time scanning to be enabled and active on the /tmp directory. If scanning is active, the file should be quarantined/deleted (depending on your settings) moments after running this command. If not, the (harmless) test file should remain in your /tmp directory.

Enter your ssh password one last time
Enter your ssh public key in the remote end for future key-based authentication. Just type your password one last time. The next time you should be able to login with the public key. If you don't have a key, generate one with ssh-keygen. Requires Bourne-compatible shell in the remote end.

List empty any directories

c_rehash replacement
When you don't have c_rehash handy. Really simple - if you have a .pem file that doesn't really contain a x509 cert (let's say, newreq.pem), it will create a link, simply called '.0', pointing to that file.

See how many more processes are allowed, awesome!
There is a limit to how many processes you can run at the same time for each user, especially with web hosts. If the maximum # of processes for your user is 200, then the following sets OPTIMUM_P to 100. $ OPTIMUM_P=$(( (`ulimit -u` - `find /proc -maxdepth 1 \( -user $USER -o -group $GROUPNAME \) -type d|wc -l`) / 2 )) This is very useful in scripts because this is such a fast low-resource-intensive (compared to ps, who, lsof, etc) way to determine how many processes are currently running for whichever user. The number of currently running processes is subtracted from the high limit setup for the account (see limits.conf, pam, initscript). An easy to understand example- this searches the current directory for shell scripts, and runs up to 100 'file' commands at the same time, greatly speeding up the command. $ find . -type f | xargs -P $OPTIMUM_P -iFNAME file FNAME | sed -n '/shell script text/p' I am using it in my http://www.askapache.com/linux-unix/bash_profile-functions-advanced-shell.html especially for the xargs command. Xargs has a -P option that lets you specify how many processes to run at the same time. For instance if you have 1000 urls in a text file and wanted to download all of them fast with curl, you could download 100 at a time (check ps output on a separate [pt]ty for proof) like this: $ cat url-list.txt | xargs -I '{}' -P $OPTIMUM_P curl -O '{}' I like to do things as fast as possible on my servers. I have several types of servers and hosting environments, some with very restrictive jail shells with 20processes limit, some with 200, some with 8000, so for the jailed shells my xargs -P10 would kill my shell or dump core. Using the above I can set the -P value dynamically, so xargs always works, like this. $ cat url-list.txt | xargs -I '{}' -P $OPTIMUM_P curl -O '{}' If you were building a process-killer (very common for cheap hosting) this would also be handy. Note that if you are only allowed 20 or so processes, you should just use -P1 with xargs.

Validate and pretty-print JSON expressions.
You can use a site like http://www.jsonlint.com/ or use the command line to validate your long and complex json data. This is part of the simplejson package for python http://undefined.org/python/#simplejson. Wrong json expression example: $ echo '{ 1.2:3.4}' | python -m simplejson.tool Expecting property name: line 1 column 2 (char 2)


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