Commands by packetloss (4)

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Setting reserved blocks percentage to 1%
According to tune2fs manual, reserved blocks are designed to keep your system from failing when you run out of space. Its reserves space for privileged processes such as daemons (like syslogd, for ex.) and other root level processes; also the reserved space can prevent the filesystem from fragmenting as it fills up. By default this is 5% regardless of the size of the partition. http://www.ducea.com/2008/03/04/ext3-reserved-blocks-percentage/

Easy way to scroll up und down to change to one of n last visited directories.
This alias is meant to append n (here is n=10) most recently used cd commands to the bottom of history file. This way you can easily change to one of previous visited directories simply by hitting 1-10 times arrow up key. Hint: You can make more aliases implying the same rule for any set of frequently used long and complex commands like: mkisof, rdesktop, gpg...

Watch and cat the last file to enter a directory
Great for watching things like Maildir's or any other queue directory.

Display EPOCH time in human readable format using AWK.

Add forgotten changes to the last git commit
It's pretty common to forgot to commit a files, be it a modification, or a brand new file. If you did forget something, git add the files you want, and then git commit --amend. It will essentially redo the last commit, with the changes you just added. It seeds the commit message with the last commit message by default. You probably shouldn't do this if you've already pushed the commit.

view certificate details

Get AWS temporary credentials ready to export based on a MFA virtual appliance
You might want to secure your AWS operations requiring to use a MFA token. But then to use API or tools, you need to pass credentials generated with a MFA token. This commands asks you for the MFA code and retrieves these credentials using AWS Cli. To print the exports, you can use: `awk '{ print "export AWS_ACCESS_KEY_ID=\"" $1 "\"\n" "export AWS_SECRET_ACCESS_KEY=\"" $2 "\"\n" "export AWS_SESSION_TOKEN=\"" $3 "\"" }'` You must adapt the command line to include: * $MFA_IDis ARN of the virtual MFA or serial number of the physical one * TTL for the credentials

run a command from within vi without exiting
":! ls -l " results in listing the files in the current directory. pressing "enter" will get you back into vi.

Find usb device in realtime
Using this command you can track a moment when usb device was attached.


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