Commands by paragao (1)

  • Whenever you compile a new kernel, there are always new modules. The best way to make sure you have the correct modules loaded when you boot is to add all your modules in the modules.autoload file (they will be commented) and uncomment all those modules you need. Also a good way to keep track of the available modules in your system. For other distros you may have to change the name of the file to /etc/modprobe.conf Show Sample Output


    -1
    find /lib/modules/`uname -r`/ -type f -iname '*.o' -or -iname '*.ko' |grep -i -o '[a-z0-9]*[-|_]*[0-9a-z]*\.ko$' |xargs -I {} echo '# {}' >>/etc/modules.autoload.d/kernel-2.6
    paragao · 2010-01-13 02:12:08 0

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