Commands by paulfreiberg (0)

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Mount directories in different locations
Like symlinked directories, you can mount a directory at a different location. For example mounting a directory from one location in to the http root without having to make your program follow symlinks or change permissions when reading.

Watch how many tcp connections there are per state every two seconds.
slighty shorter

Show used disk space:

rename all jpg files with a prefix and a counter

Compare a remote file with a local file
Useful for checking if there are differences between local and remote files.

Recursively find top 20 largest files (> 1MB) sort human readable format
Search for files and list the 20 largest. $ find . -type f gives us a list of file, recursively, starting from here (.) $ -print0 | xargs -0 du -h separate the names of files with NULL characters, so we're not confused by spaces then xargs run the du command to find their size (in human-readable form -- 64M not 64123456) $ | sort -hr use sort to arrange the list in size order. sort -h knows that 1M is bigger than 9K $ | head -20 finally only select the top twenty out of the list

Live filter a log file using grep and show x# of lines above and below

RTFM function
RTFMFTW.

auto terminal title change
above line in .bash_profile will give you window title in putty or terminal client when you login to your remote server

Repeatedly purge orphaned packages on Debian-like Linuxes
Upgraded Debian/Ubuntu/etc. systems may have a number of "orphaned" packages which are just taking up space, which can be found with the "deborphan" command. While you could just do "dpkg --purge $(deborphan)", the act of purging orphans will often create more orphans. This command will get them all in one shot.


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