Commands by pawelkl (1)

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Copy ssh keys to user@host to enable password-less ssh logins.
Alternative for machines without ssh-copy-id

This allows you to find a string on a set of files recursivly
The -r is for recursive, -F for fixed strings, --include='*.txt' identifies you want all txt files to be search any wildcard will apply, then the string you are looking for and the final * to ensure you go through all files and folders within the folder you execute it.

Convert seconds to [DD:][HH:]MM:SS
Converts any number of seconds into days, hours, minutes and seconds. sec2dhms() { declare -i SS="$1" D=$(( SS / 86400 )) H=$(( SS % 86400 / 3600 )) M=$(( SS % 3600 / 60 )) S=$(( SS % 60 )) [ "$D" -gt 0 ] && echo -n "${D}:" [ "$H" -gt 0 ] && printf "%02g:" "$H" printf "%02g:%02g\n" "$M" "$S" }

burn backed up xbox 360 games
burn all those sweet iso's from the command line. replace speed=2 with more if your media supports it and you're brave!

pattern match in awk - no grep
Rather than chain a string of greps together and pipe them to awk, use awk to do all the work. In the above example, a string would be output to stdout if it matched pattern1 AND pattern2, but NOT pattern3.

Which processes are listening on a specific port (e.g. port 80)
swap out "80" for your port of interest. Can use port number or named ports e.g. "http"

Delete all but the latest 5 files, ignoring directories

remove repeated pairs of characters e.g. "xtxtxtxt" will become "xt"
This will remove repeated characters e.g. echo "xtxtxtxt" | sed -ru 's/(..)\1{2,}/\1/g' the output will just be "xt"

open two files side by side in vim (one window, two panes)

display ip address
add this alias in .bashrc to fast check the ip address of your modem router alias myip="curl -s http://myip.dk | grep '' | sed -e 's/]*>//g'"


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